While Well-Intentioned, VR Is Rooted in Privilege and Disregards Those in Need

Augmented reality can instead reach disadvantaged folks

Often VR is presented in a way that isn't accessible to everyone. Getty Images

Like lots of people in the world, I’ve spent some quality family time roaming my neighborhood trying to capture little cartoon monsters on my cell phone. For many of us, Pokémon Go was our first experience of augmented reality. It was lots of fun. In fact, a lot of the money behind AR/VR comes from the gaming industry. It also comes from education, real estate and high technology—applications that show us what things look like and how things work.

Dan Khabie is global CEO of Mirum.
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