YouTube Is Rolling Out a New Copyright Match Tool to Catch Re-Uploads of Creators’ Content

Those with more than 100,000 subscribers will get it starting next week

Creators must be the first to upload their videos, as time of upload is how YouTube determines who should be shown potential matches YouTube
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YouTube is introducing a new Copyright Match tool to help creators sniff out re-uploads of their content on other channels, after testing it for nearly one year.

Product manager Fabio Magagna detailed the new tool in a blog post, saying that it will begin rolling out next week to creators with more than 100,000 subscribers and writing, “We know how frustrating it is when your content is uploaded to other channels without your permission and how time-consuming it can be to manually search for these re-uploads.”

Once creators upload videos to YouTube, the Google-owned video site will scan other uploaded videos to determine if any are identical or similar. Creators must be the first to upload their videos, as time of upload is how YouTube determines who should be shown potential matches.

Those potential matches will appear under a matches tab in the tool, and creators can choose to take no action, contact the creators who uploaded the duplicate videos or use YouTube’s copyright webform to request that the video site remove the content.

Removal requests can be submitted with or without seven-day delays, which give the uploaders of the duplicate content the chance to correct the issue on their own. Takedown requests must also comply with YouTube’s copyright policies.

Magagna wrote, “Before taking action, we ask that you carefully evaluate each match to confirm that you own the rights to the matched content and ensure that you believe it infringes on your copyright. You should not file a copyright takedown request for content that you do not own exclusively, such as public domain content. You should also consider whether the matched content could be considered fair use or could be subject to some other exceptions to copyright and hence not require permission for reuse.”

He added that the new Copyright Match tool uses matching technology similar to that of YouTube’s Content ID digital fingerprinting system, but it is designed specifically for creators who are experiencing issues with unauthorized re-uploads.


david.cohen@adweek.com David Cohen is editor of Adweek's Social Pro Daily.
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