We’ve Got The Revamped Issue Of Bloomberg Businessweek That No One Asked For

bloomberg_businessweek_4.23.10.jpgAs we left the ASME National Magazine Awards last night, full of cheese and Chardonnay and hope for the print industry, we were handed a complimentary copy of the new, revamped Bloomberg Businessweek April 26 – May 2 issue. And, even though the magazine’s editor, Josh Tyrangiel, mentions in his editor’s letter that no one really asked them to do this, the redesign looks pretty snazzy. Writes Tyrangiel (er, Josh):

In the five months since Bloomberg LP acquired Businessweek and I became the magazine’s editor, not one of our 900,000 subscribers and 4.7 million readers has written to demand a thorough redesign. I’ve seen letters about our coverage of President Obama and Goldman Sachs (not surprisingly, they’re split down the middle) and letters about the pronunciation of my last name. (Josh is really fine.) Yet no one felt the need to critique our fonts.

One of the more striking aspects of the magazine’s new design is, of course, its logo. “Bloomberg” and “Businessweek” get equal footing, what with Businessweek utilizing Bloomberg’s 1,700 journalists around the world. Gone is the red-and-white Businessweek logo of the past. Taking its place, in a move heralded by one of its own articles, is a sleeker, more contemporary-looking logo of black Helvetica against a white background. The look says, “Yeah, so maybe we do wear suits! But they’re cut slightly too short and we pair then with ironic frames and skinny ties, suckas.” Only in a more subtle, slightly more elegant way.

Other changes at the magazine include an annual output of 50 issues (rather than 47), and slightly heavier (though still on the thinner side) paperstock.

All in all: Very nice. We like the new, more streamlined look and, of course, the smart coverage the magazine has always been known for. Included in this issue are cover stories on Goldman Sachs sucking and the SEC investigation’s impact on Wall Street, a look at Meg Whitman’s campaign, how Apple is taking over the known universe and “The Best Company Softball Team Money Can Buy.” We haven’t read the last one yet, but we’ll assume they mean the Bluth Company’s team.