WARNING: Don't Click 'Girl Killed Herself' Facebook Posts

Warnings about the latest Facebook hoax appear to be circulating more briskly than the actual spamware in question. This one revived an August scam about a girl killing herself over something her father posted on Facebook.

Warnings about the latest Facebook hoax appear to be circulating more briskly than the actual spamware in question. This one revived an August scam about a girl killing herself over something her father posted on Facebook.

The latest round of spamware appears in several variants on people’s newsfeed walls, all generally addressing the girl’s suicide and linking here. The page asks you to click “like” to see the story and actually tells you that it wants you to suggest it to your friends.

If you do those two things (doh!) and click through, the application asks you to verify you’re human. The following window shows up in the middle of the screen, with the rest of the content shaded out in dark gray.

Click on that and a tab opens in your browser taking you to a screen that looks like an affiliate of InsureMyCar4Less. This part is news to me: Affiliate marketing has been part of the industry well before the Internet became mainstream, so I’d presumed that state insurance regulators have already taken care of deceptive nastiness. I wonder where this “scamaffiliate” is based.

Another novelty here is this spamware hasn’t taken me to a survey, although the end result is still an effort to earn a commission for the spammer. I wonder whether car insurance affiliate programs pay higher commissions than the surveys do.

Readers, have you seen any incarnations of the spamware about the girl committing suicide over a post on her wall? What about the warnings? Do you think the same spammer revived the hoax or a different one?