WaPo Announces New Education Blog, Makes Changes to Education Team

washington_post_logo11411In a memo posted today, The Washington Post announced changes to its education team and the introduction of a new blog, “Grade Point,” which will focus on higher education.

Susan Svrluga has been named to lead the blog, set to go live mid-January. Svrluga moves to this position from her role as a reporter covering the outer suburbs of Virginia. It is a fitting move for Svrluga, who had been seeking to “try her hand at something more digitally focused,” according to the memo. Svrluga has been with the Post for 11 years, during which time she has “written scores of A1 takeouts and has contributed to almost every big local breaking news story in the past 11 years.” WaPo higher education writer Nick Anderson and Jeff Selingo will be joining the blog as contributors. Selingo is a seasoned education reporter, most recently serving as contributing editor to The Chronicle of Higher Education, a position he’ll continue to hold.

Emma Brown, previously on maternity leave, rejoins the paper as a national education reporter. Brown, who has been with the education team since 2011, most recently covered DC schools for the paper. Michael Alison Chandlerwho had been filling in as a DC schools reporter, has been named to the position permanently. Prior to the summer, when Chandler began covering DC schools, she covered education in Northern Virginia.

The higher ed blog debuts following a year in which the Post experienced increased reader interest in education coverage. “During the past year, we have seen online readership for our education stories soar,” Washington Post education editor Josh White told FishbowlDC. “Higher Education stories have broad reach from coast to coast and across generations, and we wanted to highlight that coverage in a daily, comprehensive way that engages readers.”

The blog will complement the Post’s exisiting K-12 blog and “provide a single news destination for parents, prospective college students, current college students, faculty, administrators, college graduates and policymakers,” according to White.