University of Arkansas Nabs Three-Time Pulitzer Nominee

Longtime Daily News photographer David Handschuh is J-school's 2015 Visiting Distinguished Professor.

DavidHandschuhHeadshotStudents attending the Walter J. Lemke Department of Journalism are in for a treat. Joining the faculty this semester as 2015 Visiting Distinguished Professor of Ethics in Journalism is photographer David Handschuh (pictured).

Some may know Handschuh from his work at Ground Zero on Sept. 11, 2001. Others may remember the way he was summarily let go last summer by the New York Daily News, the paper he served for decades. From today’s announcement:

“We are excited to have David here with us this semester,” said Larry Foley, chair of the Lemke Journalism Department. “He brings a wealth of experience and creativity as an acclaimed photojournalist.”

“His expertise and unique commentary as a visual journalist will offer a different perspective on the ethical decisions photojournalists must make,” Foley said. “Often with little time to talk or think about the consequences.”

Another point of distinction that will serve Handschuh well in an academic setting are his dealings with the digital frontier. From his website bio:

David is a pioneer in digital transmission of images in the New York City area. In 1994, he became the first full-time all-digital photojournalist in the New York City area. Over the past 12 years, Handschuh has refined the art of on-site imaging, editing, and transmitting images for clients on deadline and providing almost real-time images for webmasters looking for vibrant photographs to post on client websites.

Handschuh has taught for many years at NYU. He was also a visiting professor at the University of Alaska Fairbanks in 2007 as well as a Fellow at the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma from 1999 to 2008. Handschuh earned his Pulitzer nominations for his coverage of 9/11, the Happy Land Social Club fire in the Bronx and (when he was with the New York Post) a photo of a man jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge in a top hat and tails.
 
[Photo via: uark.edu]