Should You Include Your Twitter Username On Your Business Card?

Yes.*

I just had a new set of business cards made at work, and I made sure our designer gave my Twitter username (@Sheamus) pride of place. It’s in the bottom right-hand corner, all by itself. It just says @Sheamus, and doesn’t mention Twitter in any way.

This isn’t my actual business card, but it might inspire yours.

Two reasons:

  1. Even though my Twitter account is personal, as I tweet predominately about things that are relevant to our clients – Twitter, Facebook, social media in general, marketing, technology and so on – I have nothing to hide on there and everything to gain
  2. For people who aren’t wholly familiar with Twitter, seeing @Sheamus written in the corner is a call to action in and of itself. It starts a conversation about my area of expertise

(If you tweet under your brand name this is a no-brainer – it must be on your card.)

The usual stuff is on there too – my name, company name, company email, phone etc. I don’t use Skype, and Facebook (for me) isn’t really appropriate for my card, so I leave those out. If you’re happy for people to contact you this way then add these, too, but try not to clutter and have some sense of priority, with your preferred contact choice first in your list.

(I don’t include Twittercism on there as it isn’t a work blog and for me is pushing it a little, but my Twitter account is something most of our clients are interested in checking out, just to see if I’m full of hot air.)

As much as we like to think the world is now completely digital, nine times out of ten your acquaintances will want to exchange business cards at meetings. It’s OK for people I meet to contact and interact with me on Twitter – in fact, I encourage it – so my Twitter profile goes on my business card. Simple as. If your profile stands up to scrutiny, I encourage you to do the same.

* Caveat: this is only advisable if your Twitter feed is professional and well-managed, and complements your business. If you keep things very personal, regularly tweet while drunk or use Twitter mostly for chatting with friends (or protect your account), then leave your username off your card. Its presence won’t do you any favours at all.