South Carolina May Ban Prisoners From Facebook

South Carolina has proposed legislation that would make inmates caught accessing the social network via cell phone or computer pay a $500 fine and spend an extra month in jail.

Despite numerous efforts to keep prisoners from accessing Facebook, they continue to do so. Fortunately, South Carolina has proposed legislation that would make inmates caught accessing the social network via cell phone or computer pay a $500 fine and spend an extra month in jail.

A new bill introduced by Representative Wendell Gilliard from Charleston could make it illegal for an inmate to log on to any social media site. Currently, the bill has 12 co-sponsors, according to Reuters.

Gilliard told the wire service that hearing stories about victim’s families finding the killer of their loved ones on Facebook inspired him to create the bill. He said he expects the legislation to be debated and passed quickly. Like he told Reuters:

It presents problems with the innocent people on the outside. The inmates have been using social networking to put coded messages out about where money is to be found, who turned them in, wanting revenge. It’s putting innocent people’s lives at stake. The goal of the bill is to stop the inside from coming out. Victims have rights, too

Facebook’s rules currently don’t prohibit the incarcerated from using the site. However, sharing your password with someone on the outside to access your account for you and update your page does go against the rules. That applies to everyone, not just inmates.

Plus, jails already ban cell phones and for the most part, personal computers, which is supposed to make it impossible for inmates to update from behind bars. Often, cell phones are tossed over a prison fence illegally to inmates, and the jails lack the jamming technology that would block cellular signals.

Readers, do you think Facebook should amend its rules to prohibit prison inmates from using the site?