Social Media Newsfeed: Tweet Downloads | Web Ads for Minors

Twitter Users Can Finally Download and Save All Their Tweets (SocialTimes) Twitter has announced a new tool that lets users download, save, and search through every tweet they’ve uttered since the day they joined Twitter. Historically, the microblogging site has been stingy with its tweet records.

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Twitter Users Can Finally Download and Save All Their Tweets (SocialTimes)
Twitter has announced a new tool that lets users download, save and search through every tweet they’ve uttered since the day they joined Twitter. Historically, the microblogging site has been stingy with its tweet records. The Wall Street Journal While it isn’t yet available to everyone since it’s slowly being introduced in the Twitter universe, the early results are hilarious. It’s like the online equivalent of a diary, in a way. USA Today Once available, users can view tweets by month or search their archive for specific words, hashtags or other criterion. To access your archive, log in to the Web version of Twitter, and head to Settings. In the Account tab, scroll down to the bottom of the page to find a “Request Your Archive” button. Mashable Then you’ll get an email with instructions on how to access the archive when it’s ready to download. The Next Web It seems that users aren’t going to be the only ones who will benefit from Twitter’s archive downloads, as one service, Timehop, is already taking advantage of the new feature. Timehop has released a tool which lets users import their archives — a direct workaround of Twitter’s own API limits, which restrict the number of recent tweets that can be pulled to 3,200.

FTC Strengthens Privacy Protections for Kids Using Mobile Apps (SocialTimes)
The Federal Trade Commission announced Wednesday it would modify existing rules governing how digital media companies collect information about child users. The changes were intended to ensure that regulations designed for the desktop Web of the 1990s, when the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act was passed, keep up with changing technology and to eliminate loopholes in current laws. The New York Times The new rule, unveiled at a news conference in Washington, significantly expands the types of companies required to obtain parental permission before knowingly collecting personal details from children, as well as the types of information that will require parental consent to collect. Jon D. Leibowitz, the chairman of the trade commission, described the rule revision as a major advance for children’s privacy. The Washington Post Companies such as Google and Viacom must also have a parent’s consent before using tracking tools, such as cookies, that use IP addresses and mobile device IDs to follow a child’s Web activity across multiple apps and sites. Amassing that data could help a marketing company stitch together detailed profiles of children to be used to deliver tailored advertisements, a practice that should be spared on children, some privacy groups say.

Just in Time for the Holidays: Book Suggestions Based on What People Tweet (AllTwitter)
The folks at Knight Lab, Shawn O’Banion, a Northwestern Ph.D. Computer science student, and Larry Birnbaum, a Northwestern professor of computer science, who brought you Tweetcast just in time for the U.S. presidential election now bring you BookRx – just in time for the holidays. BookRx tells you which books someone will likely love based on their tweets.

Foursquare Recommends, with a Little Help from Your Facebook Friends (SocialTimes)
Foursquare unrolled deeper Facebook integration Wednesday by highlighting venues users’ Facebook friends have engaged with on Foursquare. Foursquare will use public activity, but not check-ins, from a user’s Facebook contacts, to serve relevant recommendations under the Explore tab.

Facebook Pauses Mobile Ad Network Tests (AllFacebook)
Rumblings of a Facebook external ad network, where ads gathered by social data show up on sites outside of the social network, sent waves throughout the Internet. But a report from AllThingsD notes that while Facebook may still be working on such a network, it won’t be coming on mobile — at least not yet.