Social Media Newsfeed: Boston Marathon Explosions | Facebook Anti-Bullying Plea

Boston Marathon Explosions — a 'Live-Tweeted Disaster' (ReadWrite) Two explosions at the finish line of the Boston Marathon have killed two and injured more than 100, with reports constantly changing as new updates flood in. As is now par for the course, news of the disaster broke first on Twitter, and the microblogging service remains an unparalleled source of breaking news and first-hand accounts — not to mention media criticism of news outlets that jumped ahead of the facts in their reporting.

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Three Killed, More Than 130 Hurt by Bombs at Marathon (The Boston Globe)
Two bomb blasts, 12 seconds apart, rocked the finish line of the 117th running of the Boston Marathon Monday, killing at least three people, including an 8-year-old Dorchester boy, wounding more than 130, and leaving the sidewalks of Boylston Street covered in blood. Medical professionals on hand to care for blisters and sore knees in Copley Square suddenly found themselves treating life-threatening lacerations and lost limbs, as a high holiday in Boston, Patriots Day, turned into an epic tragedy. ReadWrite As is now par for the course, news of the disaster broke first on Twitter, and the microblogging service remains an unparalleled source of breaking news and first-hand accounts — not to mention media criticism of news outlets that jumped ahead of the facts in their reporting. The presumed attack has since been documented in thousands upon thousands of user-generated images and videos spread across the web through social media channels. VentureBeat Twitter is monitoring the situation and has deleted at least one account that was trading on the resulting confusion and people’s desire to help: @_BostonMarathon, which was promising to donate $1 for every retweet. It racked up almost 65,000 before being deleted. AllTwitter Boston Police Department, tweeting from the @Boston_Police handle, is asking for tips, specifically videos of the finish line. Call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-494-TIPS with any information, or you can tweet them at the handle above and also email them. Quartz This six-second loop published on Vine, captured from the local news, tweeted tens of thousands of times, left open in a browser window to repeat endlessly, re-engaging the trauma of an event still in progress, has the potential to become what was previously the preserve of still photographs: the iconic image of a disaster. It is just short enough to be burned into the memory in its entirety, while capturing far more of an event than a single image can. SocialTimes Google has employed its Person Finder tool to help people locate family and friends who may have been hurt. Users can search for or report the whereabouts of a missing person by filling out an online form. All of the information is crowdsourced and is not verified by Google. AllFacebook People started using Facebook to not only share news of the explosions, but to share well wishes for those involved and donate to the American Red Cross. Runners and spectators on the scene have also used Facebook to alert family that they’re OK. The Boston Marathon used its Facebook page to confirm that the explosions were set off by bombs. CNET YouTube has created a way for people to immediately get the latest news on the blasts. The video-streaming site has built an official YouTube Spotlight page devoted to all video related to the blasts. The Huffington Post When Foursquare co-founder Dennis Crowley started running the marathon, he probably thought he would just be updating his 63,000 followers on his progress and mile times using Foursquare. After the explosions, however, Crowley started to update his followers on his and his family’s safety and the developing scene at the marathon.

Dad Rallies Thousands on Facebook in Anti-Bullying Plea (Mashable)
When police didn’t take immediate action after a parent reported that his sixth-grade son was being bullied, the Wisconsin father took matters into his own hands — on Facebook. On March 26, dad Matthew Bent posted a Facebook photo holding a sign declaring, “I stand behind my son [Shiloh] in the fight against bullying!” Today.com The post quickly went viral, with more than 900,000 likes and shares. “The Facebook page has been unbelievable,” Matthew Bent told Matt Lauer on TODAY Monday. “I’ve heard from people around the world. Some amazing stories on the good with people from all around the country — teachers in Florida, business people in Massachusetts to coaches in Oregon. Then you hear the heartbreaking stories, tens of thousands of emails that have poured in of it happening to their kids, (and) that it’s going on everywhere. As we sit here today, there’s kids that are in school right this minute that are dealing with this.” New York Daily News The bullying eventually lessened — and now he’s gained a new perspective. “It always will get better no matter how bad,” Shiloh said. “It will get better for sure.”