15 Tricks Learned While Getting My App’s Facebook Page From 0 To 100K Fans

Running a successful Facebook page is often more about science and accuracy than about socializing. You probably already know this from your personal page: You can post great content at the wrong time or under an unattractive title, and it will hardly be noticed. The AutoCAD WS application Facebook fan page now exceeds 200,000 fans (for a business-to-business app; not a company). I had the honor of working on that fan page from the "create new page" step to the point when it reached 100,000 fans. During that time, I learned a lot, namely that simple tweaks and tricks can leverage your content significantly.

Running a successful Facebook page is often more about science and accuracy than about socializing. You probably already know this from your personal page: You can post great content at the wrong time or under an unattractive title, and it will hardly be noticed. The AutoCAD WS application Facebook fan page now exceeds 200,000 fans (for a business-to-business app; not a company). I had the honor of working on that fan page from the “create new page” step to the point when it reached 100,000 fans. During that time, I learned a lot, namely that simple tweaks and tricks can leverage your content significantly.

Here are 15 tested ways to get more likes, shares, comments, and impressions:

1. Share links and videos as images

This trick is almost magical – it usually doubles impressions and likes. When you share a link or a video on Facebook it’s … how should I put it? Well, small. You get a small rectangle with a tiny image. Instead of using a link, I upload a great picture from the post or the video and paste the link as part of the text above the picture. The logic is simple: The more real estate you take, the more likely you are to be noticed. When it comes to the news feed, the bigger  the better. Mailchimp’s blog post describes how it racked up three times the number of likes it receives by using images, rather than plain links.

Posting about my blog in two different methods – using a link versus using an image. Which one would you notice?

The iTunes Facebook page always uses pictures to link to albums. It also tends to pick different images than those in the original link in order to maximize interest.

2. Your fans aren’t interested in the phrase “new post,” — just write the actual content

You’re working hard on maintaining a high-quality company blog, and you’ve just published an awesome new post. Facebook is the first place to share it. We discovered that expressions such as “new post,” or “new tutorial,” won’t get most readers to click, even when you elaborate more about the “new” item. Instead, create an interesting Facebook post with the key points, or quote part of the post, together with a “read more,” and a large picture, of course.

3. Most users don’t enter albums 

The ratio between the number of reactions to a picture that is posted by itself versus a picture that is part of an album is usually around one to 20. Yes, if a standard picture receives an average of 100 likes on your page, one in an album will probably receive about five. There are definitely some cases where you’d still like to use albums, but remember the downsides. When you do, plan well how your album will look on your fans’ feed, as that’s the only way most of them will see it. Carefully choose the first four images and make sure they don’t resemble each other too much, even if the order is wrong. If you have killer content, don’t place it in an album.

Great example of an album posted by iTunes (interesting cover, very different images), which still receives about 10 percent of the likes a usual image (not an album) gets.

4. New feature? Don’t use a screenshot – visualize it

Competing with hundreds of other items on your fans’ news feeds is not an easy task. You’ll have to elbow your way in among cute cats, geeky memes, and pictures of ex-girlfriends. A new feature announcement is probably one of the most important news items you want your users to notice. Instead of using a screenshot — which many of your users are likely to ignore — use an image that represents the new feature. By using a powerful image, your fans will be able to understand the feature in seconds, and it will stand out among other items on the news feed.

 

5. Favor rectangular or centralized images to avoid quirky outcomes on your timeline