Pinterest’s Emotional Well-Being Activities Debut in 9 More Countries

They were introduced in the U.S. last July

Pinterest will not show recommendations or ads to users based on their use of these resources Pinterest

The emotional well-being activities Pinterest introduced for its search experience in the U.S. last July are being extended to nine more countries.

Pinterest revealed last July that Pinners in the U.S. who searched for terms indicating that they may be struggling—such as “stress quotes” and “work anxiety”—would see well-being activities that they could partake in directly via the Pinterest application.

The guided activities were created with the help of emotional health experts from Brainstorm at the Stanford Lab for Mental Health Innovation, along with advice from Vibrant Emotional Health and the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline.

Pinterest added 10 new coping exercises last November.

All of these features were added this week in Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, India, Ireland, New Zealand, the Philippines, Singapore and the U.K.

Public policy and social impact manager Ifeoma Ozoma said in a blog post that people experiencing thoughts of suicide or in need of someone to talk to immediately will have direct access to suicide prevention lifelines including Crisis Services Canada, Aasra in India and Samaritans (Ireland and U.K.).

Just as in the U.S., the resources that are part of this experience look different than the rest of Pinterest, and Ozoma stressed that Pinners’ interactions with these activities are private and not connected with their accounts.

She added that Pinterest will not show recommendations or ads to users based on their use of these resources, and it does not track who uses them, with all activity stored anonymously using a third-party service.

Ozoma wrote, “As people look for ways to cope with their emotions, searches for anxiety quotes increased eight times year-over-year, and searches for how to support someone with depression have doubled. Sometimes, you need more than an inspirational quote. That’s why we’re going a step further to offer tools people can use on a regular basis to help manage their emotions, and we hope they leave Pinterest feeling a little bit better.”


david.cohen@adweek.com David Cohen is editor of Adweek's Social Pro Daily.
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