People Are Spending More Time on Instagram, at the Expense of Facebook and Snapchat

eMarketer sees usage of the photo- and video-sharing network continuing to climb through 2021

Instagram is surging while Facebook and Snapchat stall
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Adults in the U.S. will spend the same number of average minutes per day on Facebook and Snapchat this year as they did in 2018, but they will devote more time to Instagram, according to the latest figures from eMarketer.

The consultancy found that U.S. adult Facebook users are spending an average of 38 minutes per day on the social network in 2019, down two minutes from eMarketer’s previous forecast, and Snapchatters are spending 26 minutes per day on the messaging application, down from its prediction of 28 minutes.

Meanwhile, average daily usage of Instagram is seen reaching 27 minutes this year among U.S. adult users, climbing by one minute each year through 2021.

Snapchat’s numbers differ from those of eMarketer, as CEO Evan Spiegel said during parent Snap Inc.’s first-quarter-2019 earnings call that time spent on the app remains over 30 minutes per user, per day.

eMarketer principal analyst Debra Aho Williamson said in a release, “Features like Stories, influencer content and video are all contributing to more engagement and a slow but steady uptick in time spent on Instagram.”

eMarketer expects average daily Facebook usage to drop slightly to 37 minutes in 2020, while it sees that figure for Snapchat remaining flat at 26 minutes through 2021.

Williamson said of Facebook, “Facebook’s continued loss of younger adult users, along with its focus on downranking clickbait posts and videos in favor of those that create ‘time well spent,’ resulted in less daily time spent on the platform in 2018 than we had previously expected. Less time spent on Facebook translates into fewer chances for marketers to reach the network’s users.”

eMarketer

She added, “Gains in digital video viewing are putting pressure on social time (although multitasking behavior is mitigating some of that), and gaming is also creating new competition for user attention. Although we can’t say there is a direct cause-effect relationship, these activities do at least threaten users’ engagement with social media.”

eMarketer

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