Patriotism Through the Eyes of Social Media

All of us can remember where we were on September 11, 2001. Some of us were at work, school or watching the tragic event unfold on television. Unfortunately, most of us cannot remember where we were or even what we did the following day. I, however, may not remember exactly what I did as a person on September 12, 2001, but I remember very vividly what we did as a nation: we came together as one.

All of us can remember where we were on September 11, 2001. Some of us were at work, school or watching the tragic event unfold on television. Unfortunately, most of us cannot remember where we were or even what we did the following day. I, however, may not remember exactly what I did as a person on September 12, 2001, but I remember very vividly what we did as a nation: we came together as one.

The streets were filled with American flags, and we as a nation mourned together. The little discourses didn’t matter anymore; we held out our hands to help those in need of support. We became less self-interested and in the process, we came together in unity.

Even though we became close, we still didn’t fully understand the concept of sharing. The patriotism we saw yesterday was different than the patriotism we saw back in 2001. The concept of patriotism itself was the same, but the way it was spread was different. Not only did we fly American flags at our homes, but we expressed the way we felt about our country on social networking websites.

According to Trendistic, #godblessamerica rose from 0% on September 10, 2011 to .38% on September 11, 2011:

If Twitter and Facebook were around in 2001, what type of  patriotism would we have seen?

CJ Arlotta covers the world of social gaming for development firms as well as the average consumer. Currently, he is accumulating more knowledge of the international gaming market to follow and understand what global developers may need to compete with already striving markets.  Check out CJ Media Solutions for more.