Are Online Video Resumes The Wave Of The Future?

These days the job market is getting tougher and tougher and applicants are trying to get creative in order to stand out from the rest of the job-seeking crowd. As job seekers take more creative routes for promoting themselves and showing off their skills, online video resumes are becoming more and more popular.

These days the job market is getting tougher and tougher and applicants are trying to get creative in order to stand out from the rest of the job-seeking crowd. As job seekers take more creative routes for promoting themselves and showing off their skills, online video resumes are becoming more and more popular. But are video resumes really the wave of the future?

My first memorable experience with the concept of the video resume came in an episode of How I Met Your Mother in 2009, in which Barney Stinson shares his video resume with the rest of the HIMYM crew. Of course, Barney’s video resume, much like Barney, is ridiculous (and awesome, of course). Check it out below for a laugh.

And Neil Patrick Harris and HIMYM aren’t the only ones who have poked fun at the idea of the video resume. Actor Michael Cera created his own video resume for McSweeney’s Presents all the way back in 2006.

Both of these videos play on the stereotype that video resumes are made for people who love to toot their own horn, to talk themselves up and, overall, make themselves look like stuck-up jackasses. For this reason, I had always thought that video resumes were a major no-no. That is, until I saw the following video resume, uploaded to YouTube by one Graeme Anthony.

Yes, Graeme does toot his own horn just a tad in this video, but I think he deserves too a little, don’t you? This video resume is totally original, captivating, and very well produced. I thought it was fantastic and I don’t think I’m alone on that. The proof is in the pudding – the intro to Graeme’s video resume has been viewed over 46,000 times since he uploaded three months ago, which is quite impressive, considering that the whole series is unlisted on YouTube, meaning that the only way people have watched it is via blogs, and links shared through Twitter, Facebook, email and elsewhere on the web. Unless Graeme sent his interactive CV link out to nearly 50,000 people, he’s definitely seen a lot of success with this job search campaign.

Graeme wrote on his blog, “The response has been mind-blowing with offers of interest ranging from small start-up businesses all the way through to large multinational organizations. I’ve received requests to go work abroad and some high-profile individuals have suggested that I start-up on my own which was extremely flattering.” Graeme did not update his blog to state whether or not he accepted any of these offers.

While I do think that Graeme’s video resume is fantastic, I should add that video resumes are definitely not for everyone. If your plan is to simply record a video of yourself talking about your skills and your previous experience, you might as well just send along a resume. No recruiter wants to sit through a video of you talking about yourself when they could just skim through a list of your previous experience – that’s what interviews are for. That being said, if you are going for a creative position, creating a creative, original video resume could be your ticket to a brand spankin’ new job (and your fifteen minutes of internet fame).

Have you ever gotten a job with a video resume? Would you consider it in the future?