New Social Site Links High School Football Players with University Recruiters

Anyone can join Reel Playmakers. It is free to sign up and there are no monthly subscription fees. Users can create their own profiles and begin uploading videos, as well as communicate with an ever-growing user base of athletes and college recruiters.

Reel Playmakers is a new social media website that seeks to link high school football players with recruiting organizations, fans and other athletes. Reel Playmakers already averages anywhere between four and five thousand hits a day and provides student athletes the opportunity to create impressive looking profiles, layouts and easy-access videos. If you have a future star football player in your family, you might want to consider uploading a video reel. Once the video is up on the web site, you can network through the website with coaches and scouts of universities. At best, you might even secure more than one offer or a scholarship.

Reel Playmakers also employs a staff of video editors for athletes looking to put together professional quality highlight reels. The in-house services range from producing a standard high quality highlight reel to a premium reel, complete with 3D graphics and impressive templates to improve recruiting prospects. The cost is $99.00, and all you do is supply the raw footage.

If you check out the site, you will see some impressive reels of some talented athletes. I was thinking, not only can you promote the reel to recruiting organizations, but you can share the reel with your family and friends.

The site also contains an online chat room and an assortment of training videos designed to improve the performance of athletes at every level of competition.

Anyone can join Reel Playmakers. It is free to sign up and there are no monthly subscription fees. Users can create their own profiles and begin uploading videos, as well as communicate with an ever-growing user base of athletes and college recruiters. Be sure to check out the RPM top 50 best football players for 2011.