More, Even More, About the DC Logo

More, Even More, About the DC Logo

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Jeff Stockwell emailed me a link to an interview with the DC Comics Design Director where he talks about the new logo. Also included: the nifty Brand History I posted above. (Which only confirms my feeling that the new design is a letdown.) Here’s a snippet where he discusses the limitations of Glaser’s bullet design:

The mark that Milton Glaser developed back in the mid-’70s has obviously served us very well, but the large caveat was that it was built for one purpose, and one purpose only, when we were just letterpress superhero comics. That’s all it was, that’s all he could have built it for. Not long after that, ironically, was when the world of comics started changing, with the advent of the direct market and everything that rolled from that.

When I worked at DC as Design Director from 1985-1990, I was stuck in a situation where we tried to, not modernize the bullet, but at least play with it a little to try and give it a little different flavor, because we’d started moving to prestige format, graphic novels, and more serious, mature material. So, we tried reducing it in size, and occasionally tried something foolish like turning it upright – and then we’d get our heads slapped, and we’d turn it back again – but we played with it in different ways as we could. The other problem we ran into was that as we moved into other areas, and got into things like manufacturing toys or action figures or statues, the physical construction of the bullet, the little hairlines that are built around all the letter shapes, made it very difficult to reproduce on any other medium or form than large and on paper. That’s where the practical implications of it, from a designer’s point of view began. I’d become aware of the limitations of the bullet much earlier than five years ago, but it wasn’t a situation where we felt we had to make a change.