LinkedIn Revises Cookie Policy

LinkedIn announced that it will track users’ interaction with its services for up to 30 days after users log out of their accounts, with the aim of generating usage analytics.

LinkedIn announced that it will track users’ interaction with its services for up to 30 days after users log out of their accounts, with the aim of generating usage analytics.

Vice president of legal, intellectual property, product and privacy Sara Harrington outlined the changes to LinkedIn’s cookie policy in a blog post, saying that the professional network uses cookies to “ensure that everyone who uses LinkedIn has the best possible experience,” and she wrote of the changes:

We want to make sure that you have complete awareness of how our policy works and offer additional ways to opt-out. Soon, if you are a LinkedIn member but log out of your account on a browser, LinkedIn may still continue to log your interaction with our services on that browser for up to 30 days in order to generate usage analytics for our services, which we may share in aggregate, de-identified form with our advertising customers.

You can opt-out of off-site and third-party-informed advertising by adjusting your settings. Please note that opting out will not remove advertising from the pages you visit; it will mean that the ads you see may not be matched to your interests. We do not provide any personal information that we collect to advertisers.

If you are not a LinkedIn member, learn more about cookies and how to opt out. Most browsers also provide functionality that lets you review and erase cookies, including LinkedIn cookies. Check out the updated our cookie table within the policy to share the categories and descriptions of the cookies we use.

As always, we will continue to be transparent about any changes that we make to our policy. The privacy and security of our members is our number one priority and we are committed to keeping our services secure and safe.

Readers: What are your thoughts on the changes to LinkedIn’s cookie policy?