LinkedIn Is Introducing Tools to Help Members Prepare for Job Interviews

Answers to commonly asked questions, as well as the ability to seek feedback

80% of millennials have been stumped by questions during job interviews
AndreyPopov/iStock

Nervous about an upcoming job interview? LinkedIn’s got you covered.

The professional network introduced a new suite of interview preparation tools this week, aimed at preparing applicants for the most commonly asked questions and aiding them in practicing their responses.

LinkedIn product management lead Deepti Patibandla and LinkedIn Premium senior engineering manager Himanshu Khurana said in a blog post that 54% of job seekers find the interview phase to be “moderately to extremely challenging” due to uncertainly and lack of confidence.

For millennials, LinkedIn added that 67% of those feeling uneasy about job interviews are pessimistic about their prospects; 37% “would rather spend an entire weekend cleaning out their garage than meet with a hiring manager”; 15% feel nervous enough to throw up before interviews; and 80% have been stumped by questions during interviews.

On the flip side, 41% of interviewers said that one of their top qualifications for candidates was asking well-informed questions.

LinkedIn tapped hiring managers and career experts including Jenny Foss and Linda Raynier to provide tips on how to answer commonly asked interview questions, and those tips are available in “short, easily digestible videos.”

LinkedIn Premium members will also gain access to expert-approved sample interview answers.

LinkedIn said these interview preparation resources will be available in English-speaking countries starting this month, via the Job tab in the Job Tracker dashboard on desktop and the Job tab under Applied Jobs in mobile.

LinkedIn

Practice makes perfect, so later this summer, LinkedIn will roll out a way for members to get some valuable practice time in prior to interviews.

Patibandla and Khurana said in the blog post that 52% of successful job seekers in the U.S. spend time crafting answers to difficult questions they expect to field during interviews.

The professional network will roll out the ability for members to privately share their recorded answers to questions with their trusted connections in order to get feedback, coaching and advice.

Patibandla and Khurana wrote, “You’ll have the opportunity to learn from their ideas, find new ways to translate your experience into a particular role and deepen your relationships, making preparation and practice all the more valuable and meaningful. Working with a sounding board can also help you build confidence, tighten up your responses and prepare for the unexpected.”

LinkedIn

Recommended articles