How well do B2B emails match to Facebook?

B2B marketers using Facebook’s custom audiences to match their email lists to Facebook often report a 20 to 30 percent average match rate. B2C companies typically report 70 to 80 percent, which says most of their audience is targetable on Facebook.

Users typically don’t associate their work email with their Facebook account, so a 20 to 30 percent match rate is normal for B2B.

Kinvey, a mobile back-end cloud service, gave us a peek into their match rates.

The three indie developer lists match at approximately 40 percent. These small developers are often using their gmail or personal email accounts. Likewise, the 6 to 29 percent match rates on enterprise clients is as expected.

Joe Chernov is the VP of marketing at Kinvey, who offered the following theory:

I believe our match rate is higher than other business-to-business companies because we run a content marketing playbook. Our leads have all converted on educational content offers in the past. The absence of “purchased” names in our CRM means our database quality is high – thus our match rate is high.  This is yet another benefit of running an inbound marketing program based on educational content. Certainly running this type of marketing program doesn’t mean prospects are more likely to give us the email address that matches their Facebook account, but rather it means they are more likely to give us a real email address. Good overall “list hygiene” pays off in a number of ways, including, apparently, email match rate for Custom Audiences.”

Readers, have you uploaded your email lists to Facebook to see how many of them you can reach on Facebook? If so, how many of these who match are also fans or friends of fans?

Top image courtesy of Shutterstock.

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