Facebook Scrabble Gets Another Clone: Towers

All but the original imitation of Scrabble continue to outperform the version of the game branded by the trademark holder Hasbro. That seems to bode well for the latest entrant into the space, Towers.

All but the original imitation of Scrabble continue to outperform the version of the game branded by the trademark holder Hasbro. That seems to bode well for the latest entrant into the space, Towers.

The most popular Scrabble clone, by far, is Words with Friends, which currently has some 10 times the average monthly users of Scrabble (the official one by Electronic Arts and Hasbro), totaling more than 12 million.

Now, Australian developer Bug Café added its twist to the popular word-tile genre with its launch of Towers. But Towers adds a neat twist to the game.

The basic rules are identical to those of Scrabble and Words with Friends: Users have seven tiles to form words with.

The first word played must include the center square on the board, and words must be at least two letters.

New words must connect to words already played on the board, possible using tiles that were already played.

The most prominent new feature that Towers brings to the table is the ability to stack tiles atop one another, which does not exist in Scrabble or Words with Friends.

Here’s more from the game’s instructions:

Tiles can be stacked up to three high. You may not stack more than three tiles on a board square. Tiles cannot be stacked in such a way as to cover all letters in a word already on the board. At least one letter of the original word must remain. You cannot stack a letter on top of a tile representing the same letter (you cannot stack an R on top of an R).

Bonus points are awarded for stacking letters and words — the higher the stack, the more points awarded.

The other differences from Scrabble and Words with Friends are:

  • The addition of four quadruple-letter-score boxes, joining the double- and triple-word and double- and triple-letter tiles of the older games; and
  • The board is smaller by two square tiles (a six-letter word would go from the center box to one of the sides, versus eight letters in Scrabble or Words with Friends). However, the tiling aspect makes up for the loss of spaces.

Readers, do you currently play Scrabble, Words with Friends, or both? In any case, will you give Towers a shot?