Facebook Privacy Firm Claims ‘Kids Are Alright’ the Same Day Apps Breach Breaks

The same day news broke of a major Facebook security breach involving user data, TRUSTe, the security firm behind Facebook's privacy policies, released a new survey showing, it said, that parents and teens are 'aligned' and 'alright' when it comes to online privacy.

The same day news broke of a major Facebook security breach involving user data, TRUSTe, the security firm behind Facebook’s privacy policies, released a new survey showing, it said, that parents and teens are ‘aligned’ and ‘alright’ when it comes to online privacy.

The study, entitled “The Kids are Alright,” reports that “80 percent of parents and 78 percent of teens feel in control of their personal information on social networking sites” and that “84 percent of parents are confident their teen is responsible with personal information on a social networking site.”

Just hours after the firm touted the study’s results in a glowing press release, it was forced to issue another, perhaps less planned, statement to clarify its involvement, or lack there of, in the day’s headline-making security breach.

“While TRUSTe certifies the privacy practices of Facebook.com, we do not certify the privacy practices of third party applications on the site like those referenced in the WSJ’s article,” said TRUSTe’s president Fran Maier in the statement.

Maier was referring to a major investigation by the Wall Street Journal that revealed the developers behind some of Facebook’s most popular apps knowingly released personal user data to more than 25 advertisers and online tracking companies.

The breach was reported to have impacted tens of millions of Facebook users and forced the privacy and scandal-weary social networking giant to issue a quick, and fierce, reply.

The optimistic picture painted by the TRUSTe survey is in sharp contrast to an ongoing drumbeat of bad news when it comes to social networking and privacy.

We reported just last week on a survey by Common Sense Media and Zogby that found that “92 percent of parents are concerned that kids share too much information online” and that 75 percent of parents “say they would rate the job that social networks are doing to protect children’s online privacy as negative.”

The latest TRUSTe research also found that teens on Facebook have more than just third-party app developers to worry about when it comes to protecting their accounts.

Ten percent of parents have found a way to log into their teens’ Facebook account without their knowledge, and 82 percent of those parental units say they’d like to delete information from their teens’ account or “otherwise exert more control” over it, the survey found.