When You "Like" A Politician, Does That Mean You'll Vote For Them?

It's two weeks before Election Day, do you know where your votes are? On Facebook. That's the political playbook for candidates this campaign season, according to new statistics released this week by the social networking site. So can a virtual fan become a real vote?

It’s two weeks before Election Day, do you know where your votes are? On Facebook. That’s the political playbook for candidates this campaign season, according to new statistics released this week by the social networking site. So can a virtual fan become a real vote?

Facebook sent out a snapshot of House races on Monday that has politicos, analysts and candidates abuzz over whether increasing support on social networks will translate into victory at the polls.

It’s a question no one can answer until November 3rd, but that won’t stop us from analyzing every Facebook friend, fan and post in the meantime.

Florida has two races to watch closely to see just what kind of political power Facebook holds.

Incumbent Rep. Alan Grayson (D-Fla.) trails Republican challenger Daniel Webster in the latest polls, but Grayson beats Webster in Facebook fans, with 30,000 compared to less than 5,000 for Webster.

Further south, in Boca Raton, Rep. Ron Klein (D-Fla.) and Republican challenger Allen West are locked in a tight race, but it’s West who has gained traction on Facebook, with 37,000 fans compared to Klein’s nearly 2,000.

The new data from Facebook shows that West is part of the trend of Republicans who have, in particular, become aggressive fans of Facebook indeed.

The most prolific candidates on the site are all Republicans attempting to unseat incumbents: Ilario Pantano in North Carolina, Martha Roby in Alabama, Nan Hayworth in New York and Scott Tipton in Colorado.

The race with the biggest gap in friends is in Minnesota’s 6th congressional district, where Republican Rep. Michele Bachmann has 100,000 more fans than her Democratic challenger Tarryl Clark.

Bachmann also topped Facebook’s list of the candidate who has attracted the most Facebook fans in the last week with 2,445 new fans. Renewing the politics is high school analogy, we’ll call her “Most Popular.”

That Republicans dominate on Facebook is another sign of the party’s social media resurgence this midterm election season. As we reported earlier, the party looking to take back both the U.S. House and Senate has dominated Twitter, gotten hip on YouTube and is home to the Senate’s “social media genius.”

Facebook said it will continue to publish new data between now and Election Day, focusing on the House on Tuesdays, the Senate on Wednesdays and Governorships on Thursdays.

But if you’re a political junkie who just can’t wait, head over to “Who likes politicians?” to get your fix.

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