Facebook Campaign Raises $31,751 For Wedding

A British couple paid for their wedding with £20,000 raised on Facebook. That's about $31,73 in U.S. dollars, including cash, gifts in kind and services.

A British couple paid for their wedding with £20,000 raised on Facebook. That’s roughly $31,751 in U.S. dollars, including cash, gifts in kind and services.

The duo wed this past Saturday after a 14-year engagement. Emma Collins and Shaun Parsons had hadn’t been able to afford to tie the knot until now, according to the BBC.

Between Emma’s teaching assistant job and Shaun’s work as a truck driver, money was tight from supporting the couple’s three children had out of wedlock, 10-year-old Chloe and 13-year-old twins McCauley and Page.

Emma and Shaun had entered and lost by a hair a competition awarding a free wedding, from a radio station in the U.K. They came in second place.

Then best friend Jenee Gatehouse helped them set up a Facebook group to solicit contributions to pay for the wedding. Their private page, called Emma Collins & Shaun Parsons Wedding, included updates on the event planning.

The ensuing donations that came in through Facebook included everything from floral arrangements, DJ and band, limousine services, a cake, dresses, photography, catering, venue rental, hairstyling and makeup.

The fundraising effort speaks volumes about the loyalty of the couple’s friends and family. They knew this duo deserved a treat after waiting so long to get hitched.

Now, the value of the fundraising might well have included some overvaluing of the gift donations, but nonetheless the result was something more lavish than average.

WeddingGuide says the average U.K. wedding costs £11,000, although the site doesn’t clarify what year that figure is based on. Similarly, CostOfWedding.com says the average U.S. couple spends $19,581 on nuptials, again without indicating when that was spend.

Those statistics underscore an important point, which is that Facebook clearly helped the couple end up with a nicer wedding party than any other method they had tired.

And that leads to the question we’d like to ask you, readers: Will the social network become the norm for fundraising? Have you seen other examples of this that you can tell us about?