Facebook And Texas Aren't Fans Of Serial Killers

At the request of the sister of one of Wayne Henley's victims, Facebook has decided to pull a page which apparently honored a notorious Houston serial killer.

At the request of the sister of one of Wayne Henley’s victims, Facebook has decided to pull a page which apparently honored this notorious Houston-area serial killer.

According to KHOU News in Houston, there were actually two different pages on Facebook devoted to the serial killer, and the site had pulled one of them by Tuesday.

While I’m not sure that it comes as shocking news, it’s interesting to note the distinction between an official Facebook page and a community page showing information pulled Wikipedia.

There’s also big difference between the pages of currently incarcerated criminals and those from history. Al Capone, for example, has close to 27,000 fans, despite being one of the most notorious gangsters of all time. Dennis Rader, a fellow serial killer, has close to 200 fans on Facebook as well.

Apparently, the terms of service item that was violated in this case was that “0risoners are not allowed to have Facebook pages.”.

This isn’t the first time a Facebook page has been used to promote a living criminal. Back in 2009, we wrote about one young criminal, Craig Lynch, who broke out of jail and then used his Facebook page to taunt the cops. Craig attracted over 40,000 fans and four months on the run before finally being caught.

Lawmakers are still working on policies that would further restrict whether the incarcerated can access the Internet from within prison. Most such facilities prohibit this activity but we continue to see examples of convicts getting a hold of contraband smartphones and going online to visit Facebook.

While the public is often infatuated with horrible criminals, Facebook isn’t — at least when these criminals are still alive.

Readers, do you think Facebook needs to alter its policies on pages containing criminal content?