5 Tips For Taking Mobile Photos ‘Like A Pro’

When it comes to posts by brands on Facebook, marketing study after marketing study after marketing study has found that photos and images result in more engagement than text-based posts. So how can marketers ensure that their photos are of the best quality?

CellPhoneCameraStonehenge650When it comes to posts by brands on Facebook, marketing study after marketing study after marketing study has found that photos and images result in more engagement than text-based posts. So how can marketers ensure that their photos are of the best quality?

Serban Enache, CEO of stock-photography provider Dreamstime, shared the following five tips for how to take mobile photos “like a pro.”

  1. Composition is key: Being a mobile photographer is no excuse for not educating yourself on the basics of composition: Use the rule of thirds, shoot at unusual angles, crop (to remove unwanted elements or to give a different proportion to your photos — the square frame is one of Instagram‘s success secrets).
  2. Use natural light whenever possible: No matter how tempting the sunset is, turn your back to the sun in the golden hour (at dawn or sunset) and never shoot at noon, unless the subject is simply fantastic. Shoot toward the light (include the sun in your frame), but expose on your subject — this is the famous contre-jour that can give your model a nice golden glare and will make the photo more abstract. Use tip No. 1 and frame wisely. While photographing in lower light is more difficult, it should be no excuse. Cloudy days make great photos — the light is even, and you have way more hours to shoot. Fog makes a great subject, especially during fall. The light rays or the depth it gives will result in stunning results, especially chromatic-wise. This is the best time for shooting foliage with or without models.
  3. Be selective: Don’t just shoot any subject, and always check your results. Check your results on the spot and down the road. You can keep your images to “age” and review the ones you took a few months ago. This way you will be able to give realistic criticism to your own work.
  4. Be aware: There are legal ownership rules for every image — more in Dreamstime’s FAQ and blogs — but here’s the essence: Don’t just stop at posting photos on Facebook, when those images can also be sold or licensed. For those who choose that route, always try to upload images as royalty-free, meaning that if an identifiable person is in the photo, you either need to blur him/her out (obviously it works only if it’s not the main subject) or ask for a model release (a document where he or she agrees that you may sell the image). Easy Release is an easy digital model release app. Additionally, avoid photographing copyrighted items (logos, branded clothing, etc.) whenever possible. When one of the above is not possible but you have a great photo (Time Square on New Year’s Eve, returning troops, protests, celebrities, etc.), upload them as editorial.
  5. Learn: Educate yourself about your phone’s settings and experiment. We often see great but blurry images — learn to keep steady when you click. It takes practice!

Readers: Did you find these tips helpful?

Image courtesy of Dreamstime.