Chuck Todd Lunges at BuzzFeed Over PBS Embargo Fiasco

We can see it now. The 10 angry facial expressions of NBC Political Director Chuck Todd. The 7 safari animals that most resemble Chuck Todd. Chuck Todd with a cornucopia of mustaches and facial hair ensembles — which one is best? Oh wait — in May of last year they already ran a listicle on Chuck Todd’s goatee on everybody.

The old-school newsman is at odds with BuzzFeed this morning. The last 18 hours has been a flurry of controversy ever since BuzzFeed butchered an embargo set by PBS on President Obama‘s appearance on “The Charlie Rose Show” last night. The embargo was set for 11 p.m. BuzzFeed broke it and ran a preliminary transcript of the interview at 3:45 p.m. And soon, others such as WaPo, which sought permission from PBS to break the embargo after BuzzFeed did, followed.

Was BuzzFeed in the wrong? Will Todd get over it and should he?

“We take agreements with sources very seriously. In this case, there wasn’t one,” BuzzFeed Political Editor McKay Coppins told FishbowlDC early this morning. When pressed, he added, “An embargo is an agreement, not a command.”

Todd aggressively disagreed. “Come on. It’s a crappy thing to do to PBS,” he wrote on Twitter last night. “It’s Charlie Rose’s interview. Not mine. Not BuzzFeed’s. The entire thing airs tonight.”

He went deep with it, talking about honor and manners. “This is not a legal dispute,” he wrote. “It’s about basic manners … it’s about whether there’s any honor left.” He spoke of old, worn established media rules. “Many news orgs are respecting PBS 11 p.m. ET embargo on the Rose POTUS interview. Some have chosen to ignore. Who changed the ‘rules?’ Wow, so in the obsessive world of trying to get clicks, we have news orgs no longer respecting embargoes. Can we have some rules respected?”

Todd has had a mostly warm relationship with BuzzFeed and has had the outlet’s reporters on his program, MSNBC’s “The Daily Rundown.” But he has bristled at the name, saying repeatedly that he doesn’t like it. In November of last year, theGrio.com‘s Perry Bacon praised BuzzFeed on “The Daily Rundown” and Todd cracked, “I’m not crazy about the name. I agree, I agree, the work is good, but the name sort of bothers me. BuzzFeed. BuzzFeed? Sounds like electroshock [unintelligible word] therapy.”

Others quickly jumped on Todd’s embargo bandwagon. TIME‘s Mark Halperin wrote on Twitter, “history + digital + fast food, hit-and-run culture. Forward an embargoed email to your non-pro cousin, have ’em email back. Presto.” Mark H. Anbinder, contributing editor at TidBITS, added, “There’s a generation of reporters (I hesitate to say ‘journalists’) without proper training who don’t know what an embargo is.” And James David Dickson, op-ed editor for The Detroit News, answered Todd’s thoughts on honor, saying, “You live in Washington and ask if ‘there’s any honor left’ No, Chuck. There isn’t.”

But even those with time in the business don’t all agree with that. Commentary‘s John Podhoretz, among others at BuzzFeed, remarked that no agreement existed, and Todd argued that the “golden rule applies.” Still, Podhoretz insisted, “If PBS sends out transcripts that simply state there’s an embargo, no agreement exists on embargo.”

Which happens to be BuzzFeed Editor-in-Chief Ben Smith’s take on off-the-record interviews. Ever since his days of manning a blog at Politico, he has consistently vocalized his staunch belief that they are agreements to be forged, not assumptions. “Is this like implied off the record?” he asked on Twitter last night. Coppins backed him, saying, “Is it that crazy? I see the golden rule arg, but if we never agreed to an embargo, why are we bound?”