Budding Conservative Journalists: You’ve Got A Friend

America’s Future Foundation board member Tim Carney recently sent out a memo aimed at courting young conservatives and libertarians looking to break into journalism. Carney even singles out the Post by name:

    While the editor of the liberal paper at Georgetown might graduate to find the world is his oyster, the young conservative doesn’t expect a call from The Washington Post anytime soon.

Now, not to nitpick, but it would seem that with all the buyouts and the like, the Post isn’t calling anyone, really.

The entire memo can be seen when you click below.


America’s Future Foundation Memo

September 26, 2006

Dear AFF friends,

For a young conservative or libertarian, the world of journalism can be a pretty unwelcoming place. While the editor of the liberal paper at Georgetown might graduate to find the world is his oyster, the young conservative doesn’t expect a call from The Washington Post anytime soon.

Magazines and op-ed pages can be pretty exclusive clubs. However solid your reporting or cogent and original your argument, if you don’t have a “platform”–a big name or an official certified proof of expertise “the editors aren’t going to spend column inches on you. You can’t get a job without clips, and you can’t get clips if you’re a nobody.

That’s where America’s Future Foundation comes in. AFF is the premier group today run for and by young conservatives and libertarians. AFF’s strives to develop tomorrow’s leaders: future congressmen who will reject Washington’s status quo, the presidents of think tanks that don’t exist yet, a future CEO who stands up for the free market, or the next Warren Brookes, Bob Bartley, or maybe Russell Kirk.

Many writers land their first freelance article on the pages of Brainwash or Doublethink. This is because, while AFF’s editors demand good work, they aren’t looking for big names or fancy titles. In fact, they scour the bottom ranks of think tanks, bylines in obscure papers, and the class lists of law schools to find young conservatives and libertarians itching to break into journalism.

For others, Doublethink and Brainwash provide a chance to expand their writing. One Federal Times reporter got to cover the life of a minor-league baseball player for Doublethink. Bob Novak’s political reporter got creative and penned his first piece of fiction for Brainwash. American Spectator’s political reporter covered the punk-rock scene for Doublethink.

As the training ground, meeting ground, and debating ground for the young footsoldiers of the right, AFF’s publications provide an unmatched opportunity for young writers to develop, express themselves, and improve.

I’m a good example. Over the yeras, my column in Brainwash, let me explore themes that became the subject my first book, The Big Rip-off. In fact, my first Brainwash column is a chapter in the book!

If you’re an aspiring writer, become a part of our network today. Join online here to get plugged in to these resources and into other like-minded, talented young people. And, come out to Crabfest this weekend.

Best,

Tim Carney
AFF board member