Why Your Brand Should Create Its Own Moment, Not Sponsor Someone Else’s

The investment is smaller than you think, and yields a higher ROI

The first quarter of a new year is a time to set goals, reflect and look at a new calendar year, but it’s also the start of a new cultural year.

There’s CES, the Super Bowl and SXSW, to rattle off a few events. As the head of an experiential marketing agency, it’s an exciting time for me to watch creativity flourish. These large cultural events often bring up conversations around brand sponsorships. Having partnered with many clients on sponsorships during this season, I know these can seem like perfect moments for brands to engage their consumers on a mass scale. But is that really the best way to make your mark in culture?

As most of us know, talking to millennials and now Gen Z demands that brands show an authentic, unique voice. The challenge with sponsorships is that they don’t provide enough of a framework to let a brand show off its unique values and identity. What often ends up happening is that brands get lost in the clutter as they compete against the larger cultural moment for a consumer’s attention.

Brian Schultz

Let’s look at the Super Bowl as an example. It’s one of the most highly anticipated games of the year for football fanatics, and also one of the most heavily sponsored events. If you’re lucky enough to get a seat at the game, you might be excited to see your favorite beer flowing, courtesy of a brand sponsor.

But when you head home, you’re likely thinking less about the beer and more about the game—an amazing pass, an impossible touchdown. That’s what keeps you coming back to the Super Bowl year after year.

So, rather than latching on to someone else’s moment, I encourage clients to invest in their brand by creating a moment they can define and own.

When a brand creates its own moment, it creates room for a richer brand experience—and creating a brand experience enhances a brand’s end product. Consumers will start to see your brand as representative of not just a product but a larger lifestyle. It’s a snowball effect that energizes a community and transforms a moment into a movement—kind of like the Super Bowl.
Some brands are doing just that, and consumers are rallying behind them. Here are a couple of examples:

Chipotle Cultivate

In 2010, Chipotle launched Cultivate, a one-day, free festival that brings together people for a celebration of food and music. Beyond offering a space for its consumers to have a good time, Chipotle used the festival as a platform to encourage attendees to think and talk about food and food issues in an engaging environment.

In addition to live music and on-site chef demonstrations, the festival included interactive experiences focused on sustainable food. In doing so, Chipotle shifted from offering just a product to a larger brand experience centered around sustainability.

Cultivate is now in its sixth year, with festivals held around the country, and has partnered with countless brands aligned with its mission since, including Naked Juice, Organic Valley, California Avocados and many award-winning celebrity chefs, to name a few. If that isn’t a testament to the power of brands creating their own moments, I don’t know what is.

Refinery29’s 29Rooms

Refinery29’s self-proclaimed mission is to be the No. 1 media brand for smart, creative and stylish women everywhere. Clicking through the site, the brand’s voice and mission come through loud and clear through the highly curated content. So, when it came to New York Fashion Week, Refinery29 chose to do something interesting, something to help ensure it didn’t get lost in the high-gloss, high-price world of this highly anticipated cultural moment.