Tiger Beer Turned Air Pollution Into Ink, and Had Artists Try It Out

One pen contains 40 minutes of diesel exhaust

Hit refresh on your social media strategies. Head to Social Media Week in NYC this April 9–11 for campaign insights, content inspiration and new industry connections. Register before March 4 to save 20% on your pass.

Imagine grabbing a tube of paint, dipping your brush in the black goop and gliding the brush across a canvas. Pretty normal, right? Now image that black goop is made entirely of air pollution emitted from vehicles across Asia, and you can actually use that polluted air to create a masterpiece.

Tiger Beer, working alongside Marcel Sydney and MIT spinoff Graviky Labs, did just that, creating the first line of ink made from air pollution. The brand created 150 liters (roughly 40 gallons) of Tiger Air-Ink in pens, markers and spray cans so that different types of artists could experiment with it. 

Tiger then took the product to up-and-coming street artists in Asia, a region facing major pollution concerns, and asked them to work their magic with the spray paint and pens.

AW+

WORK SMARTER - LEARN, GROW AND BE INSPIRED.

Subscribe today!

To Read the Full Story Become an Adweek+ Subscriber

View Subscription Options

Already a member? Sign in