Why the Definition of Clean Beauty Isn’t as Crystal Clear as You Might Think

And how the confusion creates an opening for brands in what's become a growing category

beauty products on a background of water droplets and leaves
Since 2010, interest in the term 'clean beauty' has multiplied tenfold, says Google Trends data. Photo Illustration: ChefBoyRG; Source: Getty Images

The last time that the United States passed regulations on the ingredients allowed in cosmetics, Franklin Delano Roosevelt was in his second term as president. The Wizard of Oz was still a year away from its theatrical release. And the beauty industry as we know it today was still in its infancy—which makes sense when you consider the fact that at the time, makeup had only recently gained widespread use. (Before, the only women who dared to wear it regularly were prostitutes.)

This story first appeared in the June 15, 2020, issue of Adweek magazine. Click here to subscribe.
@dianapearl_ diana.pearl@adweek.com Diana is the brand marketing editor at Adweek and managing editor of Brandweek.
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