Uber Urges Those Who Tolerate Racism to Delete the App

Ride-sharing company’s new campaign addresses racial injustice and is tied to March on Washington anniversary

Uber billboard
Billboards are on display in 13 U.S. cities. Uber
Headshot of Ian Zelaya

Uber riders will receive a frank message from the ride-sharing company today: “If you tolerate racism, delete Uber.”

The brand has teamed with Wieden+Kennedy for a digital, social and out-of-home campaign focused on racial injustice, tied to the 57th anniversary of the March on Washington and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech today. The campaign builds on Uber’s co-sponsorship of today’s Commitment March: Get Your Knee Off Our Necks in the nation’s capital.

Uber will send emails and in-app notifications to its users with the antiracism message and the ACLU’s Protesters’ Rights guide for those marching in Washington or in other parts of the country. Additionally, Uber is providing discounted meals to event staff at the National Action Network—Rev. Al Sharpton’s nonprofit hosting today’s Washington march—as well as a select number of discounted rides to people who attend.

Uber will send messages through email and in-app notifications.Uber

“This is less about advertising and more about activism. It’s a strong stand against racism,” said Thomas Ranese, vp of global marketing at Uber. “That’s why we are a co-sponsor of this year’s March on Washington. Everyone has the right to march and to move freely. And we want to remind people when they use Uber, whether to ride or drive, they commit to our community guidelines, which do not tolerate racism of any kind.”

Uber has installed billboards in 13 major cities across the U.S. to support protesters and call for those who support racism to delete its app. The billboards include the message, “Black people have the right to move without fear.”

The brand’s email also details its community guidelines that state it doesn’t tolerate racism, discrimination and harassment on the platform, as well as outlines its long-term commitments to become an antiracist company, first announced in July.

Uber’s antiracism campaign isn’t the first time the company encouraged consumers to stop using its app for an important cause this year. The brand urged riders to stay home in April to slow the spread of Covid-19, while it offered free rides and food deliveries to healthcare workers.


ian.zelaya@adweek.com Ian Zelaya is an Adweek reporter covering how brands engage with consumers in the modern world, ranging from experiential marketing and social media to email marketing and customer experience.
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