WASHINGTON--Like a movie monster that won't stay dead, the possibility that advertising won't be entirely tax deductible has again returned here to terr" /> Tax deductibility: once more into the breach <b>By Roy Furchgot</b><br clear="none"/><br clear="none"/>WASHINGTON--Like a movie monster that won't stay dead, the possibility that advertising won't be entirely tax deductible has again returned here to terr
WASHINGTON--Like a movie monster that won't stay dead, the possibility that advertising won't be entirely tax deductible has again returned here to terr" />
WASHINGTON--Like a movie monster that won't stay dead, the possibility that advertising won't be entirely tax deductible has again returned here to terr" />

WASHINGTON–Like a movie monster that won’t stay dead, the possibility that advertising won’t be entirely tax deductible has again returned here to terr" data-categories = "" data-popup = "" data-ads = "Yes" data-company = "[]" data-outstream = "yes" data-auth = "">

Tax deductibility: once more into the breach By Roy Furchgot

WASHINGTON--Like a movie monster that won't stay dead, the possibility that advertising won't be entirely tax deductible has again returned here to terr

The countdown to Brandweek is on! Join us, Sept. 12-16, to identify new growth opportunities, solve challenges and connect with power players. View the lineup and secure your pass.

“The problem is, no one knows what ‘a portion’ means,” said Jeff Custer, a spokesman for the American Advertising Federation.
Ad taxes have been on the minds of legislators regularly since 1986 when a published report cited advertising as a potentially lucrative source of cash for the government fill.
But even if the issue gets a hearing this time around, there is no guarantee it will win support.

AW+

WORK SMARTER - LEARN, GROW AND BE INSPIRED.

Subscribe today!

To Read the Full Story Become an Adweek+ Subscriber

View Subscription Options

Already a member? Sign in