Quibi Bites the Dust; Alexa the Interruptor: Thursday’s First Things First

Plus, Google's strategy against the DoJ

Droga5 London's campaign shows how Alexa can alter time (on TV, at least). Amazon
Headshot of Jess Zafarris

Welcome to First Things First, Adweek’s daily resource for marketers. We’ll be publishing the content to First Things First on Adweek.com each morning (like this post), but if you prefer that it come straight to your inbox, you can sign up for the email here.

Quibi Is Shutting Down After Just 6 Months

The length of Quibi’s content now seems to have foretold the platform’s longevity. Jeffrey Katzenberg, who started the app with Meg Whitman told investors yesterday that the streamer is pulling the plug. Quibi’s demise, which comes just over six months after it launched with the intention of revolutionizing mobile video content with its “quick bites” (hence the name qui + bi) of content, is the first in the ongoing streaming wars. The duo published an open letter on Medium shortly thereafter, offering a “profound apology” for “letting down” the company’s employees, investors and partners. 

RIP: Adweek’s Doug Zanger referred to Quibi as the “New Coke” of streaming platforms.

Also in streaming news: Theatrical ad spend is (predictably) down, but streaming TV ad spend is filling the void.

Alexa Hilariously Disrupts Epic Moments in Droga5 London’s Ads About Voice Control

This pair of ads start out looking like scenes from high-budget HBO series, but they’re quickly interrupted by the presence of homebody viewers who appear right in the middle of the action and star making demands—much to the annoyance of the characters. The spots, created by Droga5 for Amazon Alexa, tout the smart devices’ voice commands, which make viewers feel like they have “magical powers,” according to Droga5’s Shelley Smoler.

Watch: Experience the power of interruption.

Related: This set of ads follows Droga5’s previous Super Bowl commercial that asked “What was life like before Alexa?”

TODAY: Life Interrupted | Time Disrupted: The Long-term Implications of this Defining Moment for Generation Z

Join ENGINE, Snap, Ernst & Young, Made By Us and Adweek on Thursday, October 22, as ENGINE shares recent findings from their Cassandra Report®, which has examined the new cultural trends that are emerging among today’s youth, which values are being amplified and what behavioral changes are likely to be sustained long-term. 

A Look at Google’s Marketing Strategy as It Goes Up Against the US Government

Google is officially entering crisis communications mode in dealing with the recent antitrust lawsuit. A new blog post describes the lawsuit by the DoJ over Google’s alleged monopolistic control of search and search advertising as “deeply flawed” and argues that people and advertisers wouldn’t use Google search and related tools if they didn’t want to, and that the lawsuit isn’t looking out for consumers.

Google argues that it supports innovation from other companies, but does it really?

4A’s Advertiser Protection Bureau Tackles Misinformation

In a time when the pandemic has raised the stakes of misinformation, the 4A’s Advertiser Protection Bureau has introduced a new initiative to help out agencies and brands in the realm of brand safety. The APB’s Brand Safety Playbook, released last year, was its first step to address misinformation and disinformation, but now it’s expanding. The goal is to take the initiative into the APB’s working groups to get misinformation and disinformation recognized as a new category of harmful content for its brand safety guidelines and receive the same approaches for adjacency as other content deemed to be a brand safety risk. 

Inside the initiative: Learn what additional steps the organization is taking.


@JessZafarris jessica.zafarris@adweek.com Jess Zafarris is an audience engagement editor at Adweek.
{"taxonomy":"","sortby":"","label":"","shouldShow":""}