Invision Advertising Breaks Out of Its Legal Niche

A production company that had specialized in creating television commercials for lawyers relaunches as a full-service agency this month.

With a few key hires, Invision Advertising in Dallas has expanded its production and media buying repertoire to include general marketing services, public relations and Web design.

Kirk Huggins, formerly of Cummings Mc-Glone, has been recruited to head public relations, and creative director Chad Jordan, previously with The Core Group, will lead the new creative department.

The agency now employs about 30 staffers.

Last year Invision placed more than $23 million in local media buys for attorneys and law firms.

Legal advertising “created the cash cow for us to add on to,” said Invision co-founder and chief executive officer Jerry Bryant. “It had been planned all along to set up and specialize inone particular area and then start adding revenue streams by approaching local and regional businesses.”

New clients attracted by the agency’s expanded services include Parsons Restaurant; Solardyne.com, a supplier of alternative energy materials; and Cosmiverse, a Web portal for space enthusiasts.

Invision hopes to increase its business with current clients, too, by encouraging them to consolidate their other marketing functions at the agency.

Bryant and partner Kevin White formed Invision six years ago, after operating Excalibur Media Production in Los Angeles.

When the pair relocated to Dallas, a series of projects with legal advertisers led them to develop their market niche.

“It was just something that we stumbled into,” Bryant said.

He claims his production company is not responsible for perpetuating the abrasive, hyped-up legal commercials that populate daytime television.

“We try to go the opposite direction of that,” Bryant said.

“We really studied that target market and found that 85 percent of people who use advertising attorneys have never used an attorney for anything else,” he said.

“We want to make them comfortable,” Bryant added. “So we try to get our attorneys to smile and be more personable.”