Facebook Is Taking a ‘Hyperlocal, Hyperreal’ Approach to Empowering Small Businesses

New campaign from 72andSunny highlights the platform’s tools

Facebook is highlighting nearly 120 small businesses with a new campaign. Facebook
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If you live in Columbus, Ohio, or Nashville, Tenn., you’ll probably notice some familiar faces in a new Facebook campaign that kicks off today. The company is looking to showcase small businesses—and small-business owners—with a new campaign, “Keep it Local,” from 72andSunny in New York. The campaign is meant to not only spotlight the businesses currently using the platform to drive growth, but also to show other small businesses what using Facebook can do for them.

“There are 80 million small businesses on our platform today and there are hundreds of millions of small businesses in the world,” said Michelle Klein, marketing director for North America at Facebook. “What we’re trying to do is give those small businesses access and knowledge of the free tools and training that they can take part in.”

Klein continued: “We wanted to really point the camera at their stories, give them the mouthpiece and allow them to tell other small businesses and other people, at a local level, how they’re growing and investing in that city or in that town.”


In the works since April, the new integrated campaign—television, digital spots, print, billboards and more—has nearly 100 pieces of creative featuring 120 businesses throughout Nashville and Columbus as well as California cities San Diego and Sacramento. The work for San Diego and Sacramento will be released next week.

Facebook’s internal teams worked with 72andSunny in New York to put together the new campaign, which also aims to highlight the “culture, quirkiness and flair of each different city” with a “hyperlocal, hyperreal” approach, according to Klein. For example, with Nashville’s work, the campaign is focused on the businesses that make Nashville “sparkle and shine.” The “Keep it Local” work will run for the next eight weeks.

The company also used its own marketing tools to test and iterate so that the company could use an agile process to figure out what messaging would work best, what would resonate the most, what themes are most relevant at a city level, and which stories are the most compelling for the local population, explained Klein.


As part of the campaign, in August, Facebook will have activations in these cities and at some of the businesses in the campaigns to teach small businesses how they can use the platform, as well as the tools available to them.



@KristinaMonllos kristina.monllos@adweek.com Kristina Monllos is a senior editor for Adweek.
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