Carl Spielvogel

Carl Spielvogel

When Carl Spielvogel resigned as chairman of Bates Worldwide in 1994, he told The New York Times, where he served as the paper’s first advertising columnist in the late ’50s, he was mapping out plans for his third and fourth careers. Spielvogel, who in his 34-year ad run held chief positions at McCann-Erickson Worldwide, IPG, Backer & Spielvogel and Bates, is now drawing on the diplomatic skills he used to build international agency networks to foster democracy in central Europe as U.S. ambassador to the Slovak Republic. “There is nothing to compare to this experience,” admits Spielvogel, 71, whose post-advertising roles included a stint as CEO of United Auto Group.”To be an ambassador is a great honor, but to be in a country evolving along a democratic model … I feel very fortunate.” Spielvogel lives in the capital city of Bratislava with his wife, Barbara Lee Diamondstein-Spielvogel. Two-and-a-half months into his post, the Brooklyn-born Spielvogel says he and his wife are thoroughly enjoying the rich cultural offerings of the city, located just 45 kilometers from the opera houses of Vienna. Board member of a number of cultural organizations, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Lincoln Center and the New York Philharmonic, Spielvogel says his various activities “make for a much more interesting life.” And, he adds, prepares him for his next three careers.MagnumMatrixMagnumMagnumMatrix