Movie Night at the Last Blockbuster; CBD’s ‘Extinction Event’: Wednesday’s First Things First

Photo of a Blockbuster store
The world's last Blockbuster is opening up for three nights of sleepovers for local shoppers. Airbnb
Headshot of Jess Zafarris

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Airbnb Is Renting Out Blockbuster’s Last Location for a Heavy Dose of ’90s Nostalgia

The last Blockbuster location in the world is located in Deschutes County, and during the pandemic, locals—and even global fans—have supported the location with orders. As a thank you, the location offered up its space via Airbnb on Sept. 18, 19 and 20 to four friends at the price of $4 per night, complete with cozy furnishings, snacks, masks and hand sanitizer.

Nostalgia and community: Cinephiles who can’t make it will be able to call in for film recommendations.

Barbie’s Diverse, All-Female 2020 Campaign Team Champions Girls’ Leadership

In an especially timely move given the selection of Kamala Harris as Joe Biden’s presidential running mate, Barbie is making another run for the presidency with a diverse, all-women campaign team. The Mattel-owned toy has run for president (and won) seven times since 1992 in an effort to encourage girls to embrace leadership and participate in the electoral process, and 2020 is no exception. This year’s presidential set, which was created in partnership with nonprofit She Should Run, features a team made up of a Black candidate, an Asian campaign manager, a curvy white campaign fundraiser and a petite brunette voter. 

Predictably divisive: Of course, not everyone is a Barbie supporter, and Donald Trump Jr. took the opportunity to react.

Premium | After CBD’s Explosive 562% Growth in 2019, Brands Now Face an ‘Extinction Event’

After the category’s enormous growth spurt, nearly two-thirds of the 3,000 CBD brands in the U.S. could fail, largely thanks to oversaturation of the market and government regulations on sales of the products. There is hope, however, because the overall outlook for the industry is good—projected to grow to $16.8 billion by 2020—and experts say companies can find success through creative product innovation, rebranding and digital marketing. Brands that can effectively leverage the products’ stress-relief potential may find pandemic-weary Americans flocking to buy more.

The strongest will survive: As startups crowd the market, only those who can create the right products and reach consumers will last. Learn what factors will lead to their success.

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Planters Mascot Hits Next Life Milestone and Celebrates His 21st Birthday

We’ve all emotionally aged about 21 years since February, but in Baby Nut’s case, it’s literal. He’s now been reintroduced as the 21-year-old Peanut Jr. After the 104-year-old Mr. Peanut was killed off in a Super Bowl stunt by Planters in February—the story arc of which was paused in response to Kobe Bryant’s death—the character was resurrected by Baby Nut. Now, over the course of 6 months, the legume rapidly aged due to “a magical growth spurt.”

A birthday party: The brand is celebrating with a contest for others who have missed their birthday celebrations due to the pandemic.

More of Today’s Top News & Highlights


@JessZafarris jessica.zafarris@adweek.com Jess Zafarris is an audience engagement editor at Adweek.
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