At a time when the First Amendment rights of advertising are getting battered for the sins of cigarette and alcohol abuse, along come a couple of law professors with a b" /> Advertiser, regulate thyself <b>By Andrew Jaff</b><br clear="none"/><br clear="none"/>At a time when the First Amendment rights of advertising are getting battered for the sins of cigarette and alcohol abuse, along come a couple of law professors with a b
At a time when the First Amendment rights of advertising are getting battered for the sins of cigarette and alcohol abuse, along come a couple of law professors with a b" />
At a time when the First Amendment rights of advertising are getting battered for the sins of cigarette and alcohol abuse, along come a couple of law professors with a b" />

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Advertiser, regulate thyself By Andrew Jaff

At a time when the First Amendment rights of advertising are getting battered for the sins of cigarette and alcohol abuse, along come a couple of law professors with a b

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Professors Ronald K.L. Collins of George Washington University National Law Center and David M. Skover of the University of Puget Sound School of Law see little social, intellectual or political value in modern advertising. They accuse it of becoming manipulative and laden with symbols and images that effectively tie into psychic–but not necessarily real–needs of the consumer.

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