Busch Is Trying to Find Its Purpose … via a Video Game

By Minda Smiley Comment

Another day, another Busch campaign.

After throwing $25,000 at a couple’s wedding this summer and concocting “Busch Lattes” to ring in fall, the brand is back with yet another attempt to make noise. This time, it’s of the purpose-driven sort.

The Anheuser-Busch brand has struck a partnership with Big Buck Hunter, the arcade-style game popular at dive bars that involves shooting deer with a plastic gun. Considering much of wildlife conservation is (ironically) funded by hunters themselves through things like license fees and excise taxes on firearms, Busch is trying to do some good in this world by donating to the cause as hunting faces steep declines.

Each time someone purchases a “Busch Big Buck Hunter Permit” online for $5, proceeds will benefit the National Forest Foundation. These “permits” also unlock a new level on the game, which gives players the chance to win a Big Buck Hunter console.

Additionally, on-pack promotions for both Busch and Busch Light unlock an augmented reality game. Each time a user plays and post their scores to social media, Busch will donate $1 to the National Forest Foundation. On National Hunting and Fishing Day (Sept. 28), the brand will up the donation to $2. 

The partnership with Big Buck Hunter was helmed by Deutsch. The effort marks Busch’s latest attempt to position itself as a friend of the outdoors and isn’t the first time the brand has partnered with the National Forest Foundation. Earlier this year, the duo published a book about trees.

“The new partnership with Big Buck Hunter is one of our most exciting to date. Not only does it bring together two local bar staples, but we’re giving fans of both brands a chance to help protect our nation’s wildlife and their habitats,” Daniel Blake, senior director of marketing at Anheuser-Busch, said in a statement. “Busch has a long history of supporting outdoor conservation, and we’re proud to continue our relationship with the National Forest Foundation to help to protect America’s outdoors for generations to come.”

Comments

Advertisement
Advertisement