The Free Press and Journalism Stand Tall as Droga5’s New York Times Work Wins Cannes Grand Prix

U.S. agencies dominate in the Film category

'The Truth Is Worth It' films highlight the importance of investigative, well-researched reporting.
The New York Times

CANNES, France—Before this year’s Cannes Lions, there was a great deal of expectation surrounding Droga5’s work for The New York Times. Compelling in its message and expertly crafted, “The Truth Is Worth It” series shines a light into the relentless drive of journalists and the free press to unearth the truth to hold power to account.

At the Cannes Lions, the Film jury deemed the work from the agency as the very best, awarding the campaign of five ads a Grand Prix.

All told, U.S. agencies won more than half of the 78 total awards, with TBWA\Media Arts Lab, McCann New York and David Miami picking up gold Lions for Apple, March for Our Lives and Burger King, respectively. Apple’s in-house creative teams also won two gold Lions for “Apple at Work: The Underdogs” and “Caught on Camera” for Apple TV.

Wieden + Kennedy Portland’s “Voice of Belief” starring Serena Williams, and part of Nike’s overall “Dream Crazy” campaign also won gold, while the agency’s São Paulo office gained gold for Old Spice work, “The Endless Ad.”

U.K. agencies won three additional golds with AMV BBDO winning two for “Viva La Vulva” for Libresse/Bodyform, and adam&eveDDB snapping up one for the Elton John-inspired “The Boy and the Piano” Christmas ad for John Lewis & Partners.

Jury president Margaret Johnson, chief creative officer and partner at Goodby Silverstein & Partners, noted that there were over 2,700 entries to cull through to land on the winners. Additionally, the New York Times work from Droga5 ticked off two important boxes: “a brilliant idea combined with brilliant execution.” Johnson also mentioned that the use of the voices of the actual journalists in each ad gave the work more gravity.

“I think that brings a lot of credibility and authenticity and intensity to each one of the spots,” she said, adding that “the platform itself is incredibly flexible … it’s current as what’s happening in our world today. I like that it’s not a campaign that’s a blip. It actually can continue and live on.”

Be sure to follow all of Adweek’s coverage of the Cannes Lions and sign up for our daily Cannes newsletter.

Recommended videos