Pentagram

Inside New York’s Social Club for Influential Women

On Nov. 13, the Sunday following the election of President-elect Donald Trump, roughly 300 women gathered to "sit shiva" and "scheme" at The Wing, a newly established women's-only social club and co-working space in New York.

MasterCard Explains Its New Logo, Both What’s New and What Isn’t

MasterCard has a new look, though it might seem a bit familiar and that's on purpose. 

Design Team Behind New Verizon Logo Says It’s Meant to Be Flexible, Not ‘Clever or Flashy’

Google isn't the only brand to revamp its visual identity this week. Verizon just threw its hat into the redesign ring with its first new look in 15 years. 

Pentagram Designs Climate Change Posters Made Completely Out of Emojis

Emojis are everywhere these days—even printed on posters at an environmental rally. The popular social-media symbols found their way onto protest signs (made of what isn't clear) at the recent People's Climate March in London, thanks to design firm Pentagram, which created and handed out the placards.

Pentagram Redesigns NYC’s Parking Signs Into Twitter-Size Bites

New York City hired design firm Pentagram to create new parking signs. That seems appropriate, as the pentagram is the sign of the devil, and parking in Manhattan can be sheer hell. The 6,300 new signs deliver information in 140 characters or less, roughly half the verbiage of the old signs. Good idea, because squinting at signs longer than a tweet can get you rear-ended in midtown. Using the Interstate typeface, information is displayed in green and red sections, for passenger vehicles and commercial transport, respectively. Each section begins with a large numeral indicating the number of hours parking is allowed in that particular zone. Predictably, reaction has been mixed. Some applaud the signs' simplicity, while others say the wording is now too vague—or bemoan the fact that NYC's parking rules weren't overhauled instead. Richard Paris, a WWE executive, grouses in the Observer's comments section: "The typography weighting and layout feels strangely uncomfortable." Baby. Overall, the new signs do seem easier to read, but why go through all this trouble when most folks will just ignore them anyway? Personally, I'd show a car with a slash through it and the single word "Fuggedaboudit!" Why am I not consulted on these things? More images, including a before-and-after comparison, below. First two photos via. Third photo via.

A Media Mogul’s Daring Move to Make Chess Big

An estimated 44 million Americans are regular chess players. Some 60 percent are male, and the same percentage falls in the magic 18-35 demo. More than one-third have a masters or Ph.D., and 44 percent enjoy an average household income of $75,000 or higher.

‘The Atlantic’ Names Creative Director

The Atlantic hired Darhil Crooks as its new creative director as it seeks to inject more innovation and drama into its somewhat somber pages.

Big Ten’s redesigned logo: love it or hate it?

The Big Ten conference introduced a new logo on Monday, developed by Michael Bierut and Michael Gericke at Pentagram. The occasion is the addition of the University of Nebraska as […]