Huggies

Huggies Revisits the Baby Whose Ultrasound It 3-D Printed for a Blind Mom

Sequels are tough. Ultimately, they're rarely evaluated on their own terms. The mere existence of a sequel, in most cases, means something noteworthy, and oftentimes excellent, came before. So from the start, there's an unfair standard of comparison.  Such is the case with "Murilo's First 100 Days." The three-minute film by ad shop Mood for Huggies Brazil follows last year's viral smash "Meeting Murilo," which told the true story of a sight-impaired woman, Tatiana, who comes to know her unborn son by touching a lifelike 3-D printed model of the baby created from an ultrasound scan.

Huggies Helped This Blind Mom See Her Pregnancy Ultrasound by 3-D Printing the Baby

Seeing ultrasound images is a special part of most pregnancies, but women who are blind, of course, don't get that experience. So, Huggies Brazil approximated it for one visually impaired woman by 3-D printing a sculpture of her unborn child that she could touch.

Hey Marketers, Latina Moms Aren’t as Conservative as You Think

The Mom Complex, a unit of The Martin Agency that focuses on how to market to mothers, recently turned its attention to Latina moms, which represent a fifth of all U.S. mothers and are responsible for a third of last year’s domestic population growth.

Huggies Makes Pregnancy Belt for Men So They Can Feel Their Baby Kicking

Huggies and Ogilvy & Mather Argentina made a belt for men that allows them to feel their unborn baby's kicks. The belt is synced up with the real-time movements of the baby in the mother's belly, apparently through some kind of wireless sorcery.

Huggies App Sends You a Tweet Whenever Your Kid Pees in His Diaper

Today in useless marketing-driven product innovations, we have Huggies TweetPee, a little sensor dreamed up by Ogilvy Brazil that affixes to your baby's diaper, syncs with an app and tweets at you whenever it detects pee (in the form of a higher humidity level).

The Courage to Advertise Without Female Stereotypes

Quick: picture a “mom.” Fifty years ago, advertisers and their agencies envisioned a domestic dervish spinning through her kitchen, preparing supper with one hand while waxing the floor with the other—despite the fact that the place was already spotless. And they created ads reflecting that idyllic scene.

The Demise of the Doofus Dad in Ads

Picture it: A dad strolls down Main Street. His wide-eyed, 10-month-old daughter, perched in her stroller, giggles and coos. It’s a fall day—not too hot, not too cold. Yet a stranger stops the dad, asking if he thinks that baby could use a hat. No, she couldn’t, he replies, mustering a perfunctory smile.

Huggies Flunks Dad Test, Alters Campaign

Huggies has pulled ads from its Facebook page after folks got cranky over the Kimberly-Clark brand's "Dad Test" campaign.

Huggies ad freezes kid’s trail of destruction

JWT New York pulls off a neat trick with this visually stunning Huggies spot, managing to be both high-concept and lowbrow at once, with a humorous mock apology at the […]

Huggies ad visits theme park of parenthood

Huggies depicts the emotional experience of parenting as an amusement park in this lavishly detailed new commercial from Ogilvy South Africa. Some parents might disagree that childrearing is an endless […]