Feminine hygiene products

Husband Accidentally Uses Summer’s Eve, Then Proves He’s the Real Douche

Here's the setup: A brawny dude's in the shower, and his wife tells him how Summer's Eve cleansing wash is specifically formulated for a woman's "V," and he's like, "Huh?" And then (gasp!) she asks him if he knows he's using it. Cut to a look of horror on his face.

Ad of the Day: HelloFlo Is ‘Like Santa for Your Vagina’

Feminine-hygiene products have come a long way from being squeamish even just about the V-word.

Vaginal Lubricant Uses Slippery Marketing Tactic of Female Empowerment

Excuse me for once again having a chat with you about vaginas. Damiva, a new brand of products for ladybits whose name is a portmanteau of dame and diva, is releasing an ad campaign by Toronto creative agency Open for a vaginal moisturizer called Mae by Damiva, named after Mae West. Of course, vaginal moisture is a slippery topic. While the West considers a gushing vagina a turn-on and a symbol of youth and vigor, in places like South Africa, Saudi Arabia and Haiti, it's the opposite. There, women are known to use drying agents and sponges to get that dry, virginal feel that men prefer. A few months ago, I wrote about the feminist backlash against a vaginal tightening cream in India called 18 Again that used the language of female empowerment to hawk a product clearly intended for male pleasure. Damiva has done a similar thing with its campaign, which has lines like, "Get ready to feel like a teenager again, but with better judgment" and "Your vagina, and your honey, will thank you." But there will be no feminist outcry here. The product is well positioned, the copy is sassy and targeted at older women who are quite familiar with the suggestion that age has rendered them sexually inadequate. In fact, I'd say Damiva has a perpetual market so long as it's easier to buy a pill than to explain to your "honey" what constitutes adequate foreplay. But before all the pre-menopausal women in the house go hog wild trying to relive the carefree, lubricated days of their youth, know that Mae by Damiva is not compatible with latex condoms. And as DDB reminds us, old people have STDs, too. More images and credits below.

Purple Tampons. Why Not?

A cynic would say that no plain white surface can last long these days before some brand turns it into a marketing vehicle. But what if that surface belongs to a tampon, feminine pad, or panty liner? Off-limits territory, right?