Beards

Overgrown Beards Are Like Wild Animals Clinging to Your Face, Schick Ads Say

Y&R New Zealand turns manly beards into cute animals for Schick's "Free Your Skin" campaign, which takes a bold anti-beard stance in this golden age of hirsute ruggedness. Of course, sneering observers are all calling the Schick models hipsters, so maybe the ads also tap into a sort of cultural exhaustion with all things bearded, buttoned-down and knit-capped. Seriously, I think Tony Montana said the F-word fewer times than I've read the word "hipster" doing research for this post. Y&R did a brief interview with Metro about the campaign, claiming that the bearded creatives in the agency's employ "all confessed that their beards aren't actually that pleasant to live with." Lies and slander! They also claim that "women actually find beards kinda gross," which science would argue is only half-true.Via Design Taxi.

Tiny Billboards for Dollar Shave Club Will Soon Appear in Bushy Beards Across America

It was probably just a matter of time before Whit Hiler and Michael Dubin worked together. Hiler—the ass-kicking Kentucky adman, flier-making crazy person and mastermind of Beardvertising—has lured Dubin's Dollar Shave Club right into his sneaky trap. Yes, Dollar Shave Club, known for its own wacky marketing, has signed up for a Beardvertising program, in which 25 hairy dudes across the country will soon have tiny Dollar Shave Club billboards clipped to their beards. "We're excited to be building our business of beardlessness with these badass, bushy Beardboards," Dubin says in a statement. Hiler tells AdFreak: "For brands interested in joining A&W Restaurants and Dollar Shave Club in some hot and hairy 'Beardvertising' action, we've got over 1,400 eager guys ready and willing to place little advertisements in their epic beards." More photos below.

Introducing Beardvertising: Tiny Billboards That Clip on to Your Beard

I'm not sure which is more disturbing—the hirsute images that adorn the Beardvertising site from Kentucky ad agency Cornett-IMS, or creative Whit Hiler's use of the work "mancessory" to describe such facial hair.