Argentina

Samsung’s Life-Saving Truck Screens Take Top Honors at Adweek’s Isaac Awards

Jumping behind the wheel in Argentina can sometimes be a dangerous experience. Because the country is striped with narrow two-lane roads, cars often pull into oncoming traffic hoping to overtake slower-moving trucks. This risky maneuver contributes to a shocking statistic: In Argentina, traffic accidents kill one person every hour.

Coca-Cola Is Now Printing Cans and Bottles in Braille for Blind People

Two new campaigns from Coca-Cola feature cans and bottles printed in braille, so blind people can read them.

Ad of the Day: This Publisher Makes Books You Can Plant and Grow Back Into Trees

Normally, books come from trees. This particular volume reverses that process.

Brewer Replaces Athletes’ Missing Teeth With Implants That Double as Bottle Openers

Call it branded oral surgery. In a ridiculous, hilarious and, yes, very real campaign from Ogilvy Argentina, Salta beer has designed tooth implants for the country's rugby players who have lost teeth in games. And very special implants they are—they function as bottle openers.

Say It With Beer: Brewer Lets You Attach Video Messages to Its Bottles

Breaking a bottle over somebody's head is one way of using beer to deliver a message. Now, Andes has developed a less violent option. Just scan the QR codes—remember those?—on an Andes label to download an app that lets you record a short video and assign it to that bottle. Give the bottle to someone, and they can play the video by scanning the same code. The messages live in the cloud, and they self-destruct once they're played. (Not that you'd record anything actionable at a party or bar, where you might get wasted and decide to try this whole bottle-video thing.)

Does Chewing Gum Make You Look Like a Fool? Brand Tests Identical Twins to Find Out

Here's an unusual two-for-one deal from Del Campo Saatchi & Saatchi for Beldent gum. The Mondelez brand, known as Trident in the U.S., staged "Almost Identical," a social experiment/marketing installation at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Buenos Aires, ostensibly to disprove the myth that gum chewing gives a bad impression.

VH1’s ‘I Will Survive’ Anti-Bullying Ad Is Great Fun, but Does It Send a Good Message?

Gloria Gaynor's disco classic "I Will Survive" gets remade as an anti-bullying anthem in this VH1 spot by Del Campo Nazca Saatchi & Saatchi in Argentina, showing tormented boys and girls singing out their plans for sweet revenge in adulthood. Expertly staged by music-video veteran Agustin Alberdi and boasting a great cast, the ad feels kind of like a musical number from Glee in its heyday. It opens with a kid enduring the indignity of a dual swirly/pantsing: "First I was afraid, I was petrified/They flushed my head several times, exposing my behind." Other tortured middle-schoolers soon pick up the thread. One looks ahead to the day when, "Oh my power, I will abuse/I'll be the CEO, you'll be the one who shines my shoes." Another promises, "I'm gonna call you night and day/And on weekends I'll send texts/Ask you for all kinds of things, making sure you never rest." On one level, the video is a marvel of wish fulfillment that anyone who's ever been picked on or put down during lunch period or study hall can instantly relate to. Believing you can turn the tables feels great, and the spot hits all the right notes in that regard. Still, the tone and message ultimately fall flat. The revenge motif, though lighthearted, seems to perpetuate the cycle of bullying, with today's victims becoming tomorrow's oppressors. Yes, it's handled with a deft touch and good humor—and the jerks in the boy's bathroom using that kid's head as a toilet scrubber certainly have it coming. Even so, breaking the cycle and discouraging the behavior should be the goal, shouldn't it? There's really none of that here. (Contrast VH1's approach with Everynone's short film on bullying from a few years back, which really captured the complexity of the issue.) Also, ultimately, these bullies are free to go about their brutish business. Vague threats of corporate comeuppance 20 years hence seem pretty lame when victims ripe for pantsing are available in the here and now. Meanwhile, the terrorized kids tunefully suffer and bide their time, fated to wait decades for "revenge" which, let's face it, may never come. Bullies grow up to be bosses sometimes, and nerds aren't always management material, no matter how earnestly kids in PSAs sing to the contrary. Credits below.

Saatchi & Saatchi Finally Fills Its Worldwide Creative Director Role

For the first time in six years, Saatchi & Saatchi has a worldwide creative director.

Brilliant Coke Ad Celebrates the Agony and the Ecstasy of Early Parenthood

In a span of 60 seconds, Coke Argentina tells a true-to-life story of the highs and lows of early parenthood in this new spot by Santo Buenos Aires for Coke Life. We see a couple go through all the milestones after bringing home a baby—from sheer exhaustion to toddler mischief to the "Toys R Us has thrown up all over my house" stage.

Argentine Soccer Star Deletes His 92,000 Twitter Followers for Nike Campaign

Here's a nice little Twitter activation from Nike and BBDO Argentina. The marketer had Burrito "The Mule" Martinez, star forward for the Boca Juniors soccer team, wipe out all of his 92,000 Twitter followers and start over from zero with the goal of regaining all the followers he erased.