Survey: Not All Millennials Are Hooked on Social Media

By Kimberlee Morrison Comment

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We often hear that millennials are the driving force behind social media. Snapchat is even often heralded as a new wave in social media, primarily because of its largely teen audience. A study from Battery Ventures, a technology focused investment firm, shows that thinking of millennials as a monolith is a bad idea.

According to the survey data, a significant portion of millennials aged 20 to 25 are opting out of social media, or using it less than one might expect.

Of those surveyed, 11 percent do not have a Facebook account, and 27 percent use the site less than once per week. As sites get smaller, so too does participation: 39 percent don’t have Twitter or Instagram accounts, and 54 percent don’t have a Snapchat account.

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Facebook still dominates the social space among older millennials. Facebook has three-times as many active users as Snapchat, and more than double the number of active users as Pinterest and Twitter. That isn’t to say smaller sites aren’t worth your time, but unless you’re targeting a specific niche of people, Facebook is still the place to go.

Catering to niches may be a good idea, as treating millennials as one interest group can cost you marketing opportunities. As millennials mature, they are less likely to be engaged in newer networks: 73 percent of millennials over 30 are not active on Snapchat, and 49 percent aren’t on Instagram.

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Engagement is also important to consider when choosing a network for marketing. Of those in the study, 29 percent of millennials aged 20 to 35 have a Twitter account, and use it more than once a week. According to Battery Ventures, 12 percent have an account, but use it less than once a week, and 19 percent “rarely use” their accounts. So while numbers may be impressive, Twitter users aren’t incredibly engaged in the network.

Check out the full survey to find out what security concerns driving millennials away from social sites.

Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

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