Snapchat’s Daily Video Views Have Tripled Since May — Now 6 Billion

By Kimberlee Morrison Comment

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This has been an exciting year for Snapchat, marked by big growth and an even bigger push into advertising. While much of last year was characterized by awkward maturation, the pivot from content sharing app to content destination may well have been the move that laid the foundation for the platform’s future as a potential mobile advertising juggernaut.

Most of 2015 has been about experimentation: sticking with things that seemed to be working and quickly ditching things that weren’t, like the original content channel. This experimental phase seems to have paid off: Not only is Snapchat the fastest growing social network, according to Financial Times, Snapchat’s daily video views have tripled since May, to 6 billion.

FT contributor Tim Bradshaw wrote:

That compares with the 8 billion daily video views announced by Facebook last week, which has doubled from 4 billion in April. Facebook’s figure includes both desktop and mobile views, while Snapchat’s audience — though smaller in size overall — is entirely made up of smartphone users.

In addition to overall growth, of both users and revenue, sources say the amount of content is growing as well, including live and local stories from more than 50 college campuses and locations in several major cities in the U.S. and the U.K.

All of this seems to underlie IPO plans Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel hinted at earlier this year at the Code Conference:

We need to IPO, we have a plan to do that.

At last count, Snapchat boasted an audience of 100 million active users, with high engagement rates. Indeed, the platform is proving to be a great way for brands to connect with an audience of mobile digital natives with advertising and content offerings that work.

With all signs pointing to mobile video being the future of digital media, Snapchat seems to be establishing a strong foundation for its position in the industry, with a potential IPO on the horizon.

Image courtesy of Adam Przezdziek on Flickr.

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