France Gives Facebook Three Months to Comply With Privacy Order

By David Cohen Comment

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Facebook is running into privacy-related regulatory issues in another European nation, as the social network was on the receiving end of an order from a regulator in France.

Reuters reported that the Commission Nationale de l’Informatique et des Libertés, France’s data-protection authority, ordered Facebook to stop tracking Web activity by non-users without their consent, and to stop some transfers of personal data to the U.S., within the next three months.

The CNIL issued its order as a result of the invalidation of the Safe Harbor agreement between the U.S. and the European Commission, with Reuters reporting that the three-month deadline for companies to establish alternative legal arrangements for the transferring of data expired last week.

According to Reuters, the U.S. and the European Union reached a new agreement last week to replace Safe Harbor, but that pact is not yet in effect.

The CNIL said in a statement, as reported by Reuters:

Facebook transfers personal data to the U.S. on the basis of Safe Harbor, although the Court of Justice of the European Union declared invalid such transfers in its ruling of Oct. 6, 2015.

Facebook maintained that it complies with data-protection laws in the EU, with a spokeswoman telling Reuters:

Protecting the privacy of the people who use Facebook is at the heart of everything we do. We … look forward to engaging with the CNIL to respond to their concerns.

Readers: How do you think this situation will play out?

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