Facebook partners with Google, Twitter, others to launch ‘TODO’

By Justin Lafferty Comment

TODO650

At the @Scale conference Monday, Facebook announced a partnership with Box, Dropbox, GitHub, Google, Khan Academy, Stripe, Square, Twitter, and Walmart Labs to launch TODO — Talk Openly, Develop Openly.

The organization will be a think-tank for the issues facing open source developing, offering discussion and best practices.

Facebook’s James Pearce described TODO in a blog post:

Today at @Scale 2014 we joined a number of other companies in launching a new open source collaboration called TODO. The group — whose name is a backronym for “talk openly, develop openly” — was formed to address the challenges that companies like ours have encountered in consuming open source software and running open source programs.

We’ll have more to share about our plans in the coming weeks, but our overall goal in this collaboration is to make open source easier for everyone. We want to run better, more impactful open source programs in our own companies; we want to make it easier for people to consume the technologies we open source; and we want to help create a roadmap for companies that want to create their open source programs but aren’t sure how to proceed.

Also at the @Scale conference, Facebook announced that it is open sourcing mcrouter, a memcached protocol router that Facebook uses to handle traffic to, from and between thousands of cache servers across dozens of clusters in Facebook data centers around the world:

Last year, at the Data@Scale event and at the USENIX Networked Systems Design and Implementation conference , we spoke about turning caches into distributed systems using software we developed called mcrouter (pronounced “mick-router”). Mcrouter is a memcached protocol router that is used at Facebook to handle all traffic to, from, and between thousands of cache servers across dozens of clusters distributed in our data centers around the world. It is proven at massive scale — at peak, mcrouter handles close to 5 billion requests per second. Mcrouter was also proven to work as a standalone binary in an Amazon Web Services setup when Instagram used it last year before fully transitioning to Facebook’s infrastructure.

Today, we are excited to announce that we are releasing mcrouter’s code under an open-source BSD license. We believe it will help many sites scale more easily by leveraging Facebook’s knowledge about large-scale systems in an easy-to-understand and easy-to-deploy package.

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